Next Article in Journal
Cure Behavior and Thermomechanical Properties of Phthalonitrile–Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxane Copolymers
Next Article in Special Issue
Ring Polymers: Threadings, Knot Electrophoresis and Topological Glasses
Previous Article in Journal
Effects of Amino-Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes on the Crystal Structure and Thermal Properties of Polyacrylonitrile Homopolymer Microspheres
Previous Article in Special Issue
Mechanical Pulling of Linked Ring Polymers: Elastic Response and Link Localisation
Article Menu
Issue 8 (August) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Polymers 2017, 9(8), 317; doi:10.3390/polym9080317

Are There Knots in Chromosomes?

Department of Physics, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Staudinger Weg 9, 55128 Mainz, Germany
Department of Biochemistry, University of Cambridge, 80 Tennis Court Road, Cambridge CB2 1GA, UK
MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Francis Crick Avenue, Cambridge Biomedical Campus, Cambridge CB2 0QH, UK
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 30 June 2017 / Revised: 24 July 2017 / Accepted: 25 July 2017 / Published: 2 August 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Knotted and Catenated Polymers)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [11585 KB, uploaded 4 August 2017]   |  


Recent developments have for the first time allowed the determination of three-dimensional structures of individual chromosomes and genomes in nuclei of single haploid mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells based on Hi–C chromosome conformation contact data. Although these first structures have a relatively low resolution, they provide the first experimental data that can be used to study chromosome and intact genome folding. Here we further analyze these structures and provide the first evidence that G1 phase chromosomes are knotted, consistent with the fact that plots of contact probability vs sequence separation show a power law dependence that is intermediate between that of a fractal globule and an equilibrium structure. View Full-Text
Keywords: knots; chromosomes; chromosome territories; DNA; fractal globule knots; chromosomes; chromosome territories; DNA; fractal globule

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Siebert, J.T.; Kivel, A.N.; Atkinson, L.P.; Stevens, T.J.; Laue, E.D.; Virnau, P. Are There Knots in Chromosomes? Polymers 2017, 9, 317.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics



[Return to top]
Polymers EISSN 2073-4360 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top