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Catalysts 2017, 7(1), 31; doi:10.3390/catal7010031

Nanostructured Inorganic Materials at Work in Electrochemical Sensing and Biofuel Cells

1
Institut Européen des Membranes, IEM UMR 5635, CNRS-UM-ENSCM, Place Eugène Bataillon, 34095 Montpellier CEDEX 5, France
2
UMR 7285 CNRS, “Équipe SAMCat”, Université de Poitiers, 4 rue Michel Brunet, B27, TSA 51106, 86073 Poitiers CEDEX 09, France
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Angeliki A. Lemonidou
Received: 30 November 2016 / Revised: 9 January 2017 / Accepted: 11 January 2017 / Published: 18 January 2017
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [7206 KB, uploaded 18 January 2017]   |  

Abstract

The future of analytical devices, namely (bio)sensors, which are currently impacting our everyday life, relies on several metrics such as low cost, high sensitivity, good selectivity, rapid response, real-time monitoring, high-throughput, easy-to-make and easy-to-handle properties. Fortunately, they can be readily fulfilled by electrochemical methods. For decades, electrochemical sensors and biofuel cells operating in physiological conditions have concerned biomolecular science where enzymes act as biocatalysts. However, immobilizing them on a conducting substrate is tedious and the resulting bioelectrodes suffer from stability. In this contribution, we provide a comprehensive, authoritative, critical, and readable review of general interest that surveys interdisciplinary research involving materials science and (bio)electrocatalysis. Specifically, it recounts recent developments focused on the introduction of nanostructured metallic and carbon-based materials as robust “abiotic catalysts” or scaffolds in bioelectrochemistry to boost and increase the current and readout signals as well as the lifetime. Compared to biocatalysts, abiotic catalysts are in a better position to efficiently cope with fluctuations of temperature and pH since they possess high intrinsic thermal stability, exceptional chemical resistance and long-term stability, already highlighted in classical electrocatalysis. We also diagnosed their intrinsic bottlenecks and highlighted opportunities of unifying the materials science and bioelectrochemistry fields to design hybrid platforms with improved performance. View Full-Text
Keywords: nanomaterials; electrocatalysis; bioelectrocatalysis; electroanalysis; non-enzymatic sensing; glucose; sensor; biosensor; electrochemical sensing; biofuel cells nanomaterials; electrocatalysis; bioelectrocatalysis; electroanalysis; non-enzymatic sensing; glucose; sensor; biosensor; electrochemical sensing; biofuel cells
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Holade, Y.; Tingry, S.; Servat, K.; Napporn, T.W.; Cornu, D.; Kokoh, K.B. Nanostructured Inorganic Materials at Work in Electrochemical Sensing and Biofuel Cells. Catalysts 2017, 7, 31.

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