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Remote Sens. 2017, 9(8), 794; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs9080794

Canopy-Level Photochemical Reflectance Index from Hyperspectral Remote Sensing and Leaf-Level Non-Photochemical Quenching as Early Indicators of Water Stress in Maize

1
Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory of Geographic Information Science and Technology, International Institute for Earth System Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023, China
2
School of Geographic and Oceanographic Sciences, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023, China
3
Department of Geography and Program in Planning, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 3G3, Canada
4
Department of Geography, Government College University, Faisalabad 38000, Pakistan
5
School of Applied Meteorology, Nanjing University of Information Science & Technology, Nanjing 210044, China
6
Institute of Botany, Jiangsu Province and Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210014, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 13 June 2017 / Revised: 21 July 2017 / Accepted: 28 July 2017 / Published: 2 August 2017
(This article belongs to the Section Remote Sensing in Agriculture and Vegetation)
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Abstract

In this study, we evaluated the effectiveness of photochemical reflectance index (PRI) and non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) for assessing water stress in maize for the purpose of developing remote sensing techniques for monitoring water deficits in crops. Leaf-level chlorophyll fluorescence and canopy-level PRI were measured concurrently over a maize field with five different irrigation treatments, ranging from 20% to 90% of the field capacity (FC). Significant correlations were found between leaf-level NPQ (NPQleaf) and the ratio of chlorophyll to carotenoid content (Chl/Car) (R2 = 0.71, p < 0.01) and between NPQleaf and the actual photochemical efficiency of photosystem II (ΔF/Fm′) (R2 = 0.81, p < 0.005). At the early growing stage, both canopy-level PRI and NPQleaf are good indicators of water stress (R2 = 0.65 and p < 0.05; R2 = 0.63 and p < 0.05, respectively). For assessment of extreme water stress on plant growth, a relationship is also established between the quantum yield of photochemistry in PSII (ΦP) and the quantum yield of fluorescence (ΦF) as determined from photochemical quenching (PQ) and non-photochemical quenching (NPQleaf) of excitation energy at different water stress levels. These results would be helpful in monitoring soil water stress on crops at large scales using remote sensing techniques. View Full-Text
Keywords: non-photochemical quenching; photochemical quenching; photochemical reflectance index; water stress; soil moisture non-photochemical quenching; photochemical quenching; photochemical reflectance index; water stress; soil moisture
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
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Chou, S.; Chen, J.M.; Yu, H.; Chen, B.; Zhang, X.; Croft, H.; Khalid, S.; Li, M.; Shi, Q. Canopy-Level Photochemical Reflectance Index from Hyperspectral Remote Sensing and Leaf-Level Non-Photochemical Quenching as Early Indicators of Water Stress in Maize. Remote Sens. 2017, 9, 794.

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