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Remote Sens. 2017, 9(6), 528; doi:10.3390/rs9060528

Comparison of Three Theoretical Methods for Determining Dry and Wet Edges of the LST/FVC Space: Revisit of Method Physics

College of Geoscience and Surveying Engineering, China University of Mining and Technology, Beijing 100083, China
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Academic Editors: Soe Myint and Prasad S. Thenkabai
Received: 10 April 2017 / Revised: 17 May 2017 / Accepted: 24 May 2017 / Published: 26 May 2017
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Abstract

Land surface temperature and fractional vegetation coverage (LST/FVC) space is a classical model for estimating evapotranspiration, soil moisture, and drought monitoring based on remote sensing. One of the key issues in its utilization is to determine its boundaries, i.e., the dry and wet edges. In this study, we revisited and compared three methods that were presented by Moran et al. (1994), Long et al. (2012), and Sun (2016) for calculating the dry and wet edges theoretically. Results demonstrated that: (1) for the dry edge, the Sun method is equal to the Long method and they have greater vegetation temperature than that of the Moran method. (2) With respect to the wet edge, there are greater differences among the three methods. Generally, Long’s wet edge is a horizontal line equaling air temperature. Sun’s wet edge is an oblique line and is higher than that of the Long’s. Moran’s wet edge intersects them with a higher soil temperature and a lower vegetation temperature. (3) The Sun and Long methods are simpler in calculation and can circumvent some complex parameters as compared with the Moran method. Moreover, they outperformed the Moran method in a comparison of estimating latent heat flux (LE), where determination coefficients varied between 0.45 ~ 0.66 (Sun), 0.47 ~ 0.68 (Long), and 0.39 ~ 0.57 (Moran) among field stations. View Full-Text
Keywords: remote sensing; dry edge; wet edge; evapotranspiration; soil moisture; drought remote sensing; dry edge; wet edge; evapotranspiration; soil moisture; drought
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Sun, H.; Wang, Y.; Liu, W.; Yuan, S.; Nie, R. Comparison of Three Theoretical Methods for Determining Dry and Wet Edges of the LST/FVC Space: Revisit of Method Physics. Remote Sens. 2017, 9, 528.

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