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Remote Sens. 2016, 8(5), 380; doi:10.3390/rs8050380

Physical Layer Definition for a Long-Haul HF Antarctica to Spain Radio Link

1
GTM—Grup de Recerca en Tecnologies Mèdia, La Salle—Universitat Ramon Llull, C/Quatre Camins, 30, 08022 Barcelona, Spain
2
GR-SETAD, La Salle—Universitat Ramon Llull, C/Quatre Camins, 30, 08022 Barcelona, Spain
3
Observatori de l’Ebre (OE), CSIC—Universitat Ramon Llull, Horta Alta 38, 43520 Roquetes, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Ioannis Gitas and Prasad S. Thenkabail
Received: 9 March 2016 / Revised: 20 April 2016 / Accepted: 25 April 2016 / Published: 4 May 2016
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Abstract

La Salle and the Observatori de l’Ebre (OE) have been involved in a remote sensing project in Antarctica for the last 11 years. The OE has been monitoring the geomagnetic activity for more than twenty years and also the ionospheric activity of the last ten years in the Spanish Antarctic Station Juan Carlos I (ASJI) (62.7 ° S, 299.6 ° E). La Salle is finishing the design and testing of a low-power communication system between the ASJI and Cambrils (41.0 ° N, 1.0 ° E) with a double goal: (i) the transmission of data from the sensors located at the ASJI and (ii) the performance of an oblique ionospheric sounding of a 12,760 km HF link. Previously, La Salle has already performed sounding and modulation tests to describe the channel performance in terms of availability, Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR), Doppler spread and delay spread. This paper closes the design of the physical layer, by means of the channel error study and the synchronization performance, and concludes with a new physical layer proposal for the Oblique Ionosphere Sounder. Narrowband and wideband frames have been defined to be used when the oblique sounder performs as an ionospheric sensor. Finally, two transmission modes have been defined for the modem performance: the High Robustness Mode (HRM) for low SNR hours and the High Throughput Mode (HTM) for the high SNR hours. View Full-Text
Keywords: physical layer; modulation; synchronization; symbol error rate; geomagnetism; observatories; ionosphere; HF modem; long-haul link; remote sensing physical layer; modulation; synchronization; symbol error rate; geomagnetism; observatories; ionosphere; HF modem; long-haul link; remote sensing
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Alsina-Pagès, R.M.; Hervás, M.; Orga, F.; Pijoan, J.L.; Badia, D.; Altadill, D. Physical Layer Definition for a Long-Haul HF Antarctica to Spain Radio Link. Remote Sens. 2016, 8, 380.

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