Next Article in Journal
Data Service Platform for Sentinel-2 Surface Reflectance and Value-Added Products: System Use and Examples
Previous Article in Journal
An Optimal Sample Data Usage Strategy to Minimize Overfitting and Underfitting Effects in Regression Tree Models Based on Remotely-Sensed Data
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Remote Sens. 2016, 8(11), 944; doi:10.3390/rs8110944

Grassland and Cropland Net Ecosystem Production of the U.S. Great Plains: Regression Tree Model Development and Comparative Analysis

1
Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Sioux Falls, SD 57198, USA
2
Stinger Ghaffarian Technologies (SGT), Contractor to USGS EROS Center, Sioux Falls, SD 57198, USA
3
Gilmanov Research & Consulting, LLP, Brookings, SD 57006, USA
4
ASRC InuTeq, Contractor to USGS EROS Center, Sioux Falls, SD 57198, USA
5
Key Laboratory of Digital Earth Science, Institute of Remote Sensing and Digital Earth, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100094, China
These authors contributed equally to this work.
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Clement Atzberger and Prasad S. Thenkabail
Received: 24 August 2016 / Revised: 31 October 2016 / Accepted: 8 November 2016 / Published: 11 November 2016
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [14204 KB, uploaded 11 November 2016]   |  

Abstract

This paper presents the methodology and results of two ecological-based net ecosystem production (NEP) regression tree models capable of up scaling measurements made at various flux tower sites throughout the U.S. Great Plains. Separate grassland and cropland NEP regression tree models were trained using various remote sensing data and other biogeophysical data, along with 15 flux towers contributing to the grassland model and 15 flux towers for the cropland model. The models yielded weekly mean daily grassland and cropland NEP maps of the U.S. Great Plains at 250 m resolution for 2000–2008. The grassland and cropland NEP maps were spatially summarized and statistically compared. The results of this study indicate that grassland and cropland ecosystems generally performed as weak net carbon (C) sinks, absorbing more C from the atmosphere than they released from 2000 to 2008. Grasslands demonstrated higher carbon sink potential (139 g C·m−2·year−1) than non-irrigated croplands. A closer look into the weekly time series reveals the C fluctuation through time and space for each land cover type. View Full-Text
Keywords: grassland; crop; carbon flux; net ecosystem production; regression tree; U.S. Great Plains grassland; crop; carbon flux; net ecosystem production; regression tree; U.S. Great Plains
Figures

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Supplementary material

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Wylie, B.; Howard, D.; Dahal, D.; Gilmanov, T.; Ji, L.; Zhang, L.; Smith, K. Grassland and Cropland Net Ecosystem Production of the U.S. Great Plains: Regression Tree Model Development and Comparative Analysis. Remote Sens. 2016, 8, 944.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Remote Sens. EISSN 2072-4292 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top