Remote Sens. 2013, 5(3), 1177-1203; doi:10.3390/rs5031177
Article

Trends and ENSO/AAO Driven Variability in NDVI Derived Productivity and Phenology alongside the Andes Mountains

1 School of Natural Resources and the Environment, Office of Arid Lands Studies, Arizona Remote Sensing Center, 1955 E. Sixth Street, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA 2 School of Geography and Development, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA 3 Departamento de Ecosistemas y Medio Ambiente, Centro Interdisciplinario de Cambio Global, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Av. Vicuña Mackenna 4860, 7820436, Santiago, Chile
* Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 31 December 2012; in revised form: 27 February 2013 / Accepted: 27 February 2013 / Published: 6 March 2013
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Monitoring Global Vegetation with AVHRR NDVI3g Data (1981-2011))
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Abstract: Increasing water use and droughts, along with climate variability and land use change, have seriously altered vegetation growth patterns and ecosystem response in several regions alongside the Andes Mountains. Thirty years of the new generation biweekly normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI3g) time series data show significant land cover specific trends and variability in annual productivity and land surface phenological response. Productivity is represented by the growing season mean NDVI values (July to June). Arid and semi-arid and sub humid vegetation types (Atacama desert, Chaco and Patagonia) across Argentina, northern Chile, northwest Uruguay and southeast Bolivia show negative trends in productivity, while some temperate forest and agricultural areas in Chile and sub humid and humid areas in Brazil, Bolivia and Peru show positive trends in productivity. The start (SOS) and length (LOS) of the growing season results show large variability and regional hot spots where later SOS often coincides with reduced productivity. A longer growing season is generally found for some locations in the south of Chile (sub-antarctic forest) and Argentina (Patagonia steppe), while central Argentina (Pampa-mixed grasslands and agriculture) has a shorter LOS. Some of the areas have significant shifts in SOS and LOS of one to several months. The seasonal Multivariate ENSO Indicator (MEI) and the Antarctic Oscillation (AAO) index have a significant impact on vegetation productivity and phenology in southeastern and northeastern Argentina (Patagonia and Pampa), central and southern Chile (mixed shrubland, temperate and sub-antarctic forest), and Paraguay (Chaco).
Keywords: NDVI; phenology; climate; MEI; AAO; time series; variability; trends; South America; Atacama; Chaco; Patagonia; Pampa

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    Trends and ENSO/AAO Driven Variability in NDVI Derived Productivity and Phenology alongside the Andes Mountains. Remote Sensing 2013, 5, 1177–1203

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MDPI and ACS Style

van Leeuwen, W.J.; Hartfield, K.; Miranda, M.; Meza, F.J. Trends and ENSO/AAO Driven Variability in NDVI Derived Productivity and Phenology alongside the Andes Mountains. Remote Sens. 2013, 5, 1177-1203.

AMA Style

van Leeuwen WJ, Hartfield K, Miranda M, Meza FJ. Trends and ENSO/AAO Driven Variability in NDVI Derived Productivity and Phenology alongside the Andes Mountains. Remote Sensing. 2013; 5(3):1177-1203.

Chicago/Turabian Style

van Leeuwen, Willem J.; Hartfield, Kyle; Miranda, Marcelo; Meza, Francisco J. 2013. "Trends and ENSO/AAO Driven Variability in NDVI Derived Productivity and Phenology alongside the Andes Mountains." Remote Sens. 5, no. 3: 1177-1203.

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