Next Article in Journal
C-Band SAR Imagery for Snow-Cover Monitoring at Treeline, Churchill, Manitoba, Canada
Previous Article in Journal
Road Target Search and Tracking with Gimballed Vision Sensor on an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle
Previous Article in Special Issue
Using MODIS-NDVI for the Modeling of Post-Wildfire Vegetation Response as a Function of Environmental Conditions and Pre-Fire Restoration Treatments
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Remote Sens. 2012, 4(7), 2112-2132; doi:10.3390/rs4072112

Utility of Remotely Sensed Imagery for Assessing the Impact of Salvage Logging after Forest Fires

1
Rocky Mountain Research Station, US Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Moscow, ID 83843, USA
2
Department of Forest, Rangeland, and Fire Sciences, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 1 February 2012 / Revised: 4 July 2012 / Accepted: 5 July 2012 / Published: 13 July 2012
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Remote Sensing of Wildland Fires)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [950 KB, uploaded 19 June 2014]   |  

Abstract

Remotely sensed imagery provides a useful tool for land managers to assess the extent and severity of post-wildfire salvage logging disturbance. This investigation uses high resolution QuickBird and National Agricultural Imagery Program (NAIP) imagery to map soil exposure after ground-based salvage operations. Three wildfires with varying post-fire salvage activities and variable ground truth data were used to evaluate the utility of remotely sensed imagery for disturbance classification. The Red Eagle Fire in northwestern Montana had intensive ground truthing with GPS-equipment logging equipment to map their travel paths, the Tripod Fire in north central Washington had ground truthed disturbance transects, and the School Fire in southeastern Washington had no salvage-specific ground truthing but pre-and post-salvage images were available. Spectral mixture analysis (SMA) and principle component analysis (PCA) were used to evaluate the imagery. Our results showed that soil exposure (disturbance) was measureable when pre-and post-salvage QuickBird images were compared at one site. At two of the sites, only post-salvage imagery was available, and the soil exposure correlated well to salvage logging equipment disturbance at one site. When ground disturbance transects were compared to NAIP imagery two years after the salvage operation, it was difficult to identify disturbance due to vegetation regrowth. These results indicate that soil exposure (ground disturbance) by salvage operation can be detected with remotely sensed imagery especially if the images are taken less than two years after the salvage operation. View Full-Text
Keywords: QuickBird; NAIP; School Fire; Red Eagle Fire; Tripod Fire; spectral mixture analysis QuickBird; NAIP; School Fire; Red Eagle Fire; Tripod Fire; spectral mixture analysis
Figures

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY 3.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Lewis, S.A.; Robichaud, P.R.; Hudak, A.T.; Austin, B.; Liebermann, R.J. Utility of Remotely Sensed Imagery for Assessing the Impact of Salvage Logging after Forest Fires. Remote Sens. 2012, 4, 2112-2132.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Remote Sens. EISSN 2072-4292 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top