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Sustainability 2017, 9(9), 1544; doi:10.3390/su9091544

Overheating and Daylighting; Assessment Tool in Early Design of London’s High-Rise Residential Buildings

1
Roberts and Treguer Ltd., London E1 7SA, UK
2
Architectural Engineering Department, United Arab Emirates University, P.O. Box 15551 Al Ain, UAE
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 30 June 2017 / Revised: 22 August 2017 / Accepted: 23 August 2017 / Published: 30 August 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation - ZEMCH 2016)
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Abstract

High-rise residential buildings in dense cities, such as London, are a common response to housing shortage. The apartments in these buildings may experience different levels of thermal and visual comfort, depending on their orientation and floor level. This paper aims to develop simplified tools to predict internal temperatures and daylighting levels, and propose a tool to quickly assess overheating risk and daylight performance in London’s high-rise residential buildings. Single- and double-sided apartments in a high-rise building were compared, and the impact of their floor level, glazing ratio, thermal mass, ventilation strategy and orientation was investigated. Using Integrated Environmental Solutions Virtual Environment (IES VE), temperature and daylight factor results of each design variable were used to develop early design tools to predict and assess overheating risks and daylighting levels. The results indicate that apartments that are more exposed to solar radiations, through either orientation or floor level, are more susceptible to overheat in the summer while exceeding the daylighting recommendations. Different design strategies at different levels and orientations are subsequently discussed. View Full-Text
Keywords: overheating; daylighting; design tool; assessment tool; London; high-rise; residential; floor-level; orientation; glazing overheating; daylighting; design tool; assessment tool; London; high-rise; residential; floor-level; orientation; glazing
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Nebia, B.; Tabet Aoul, K. Overheating and Daylighting; Assessment Tool in Early Design of London’s High-Rise Residential Buildings. Sustainability 2017, 9, 1544.

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