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Sustainability 2017, 9(2), 250; doi:10.3390/su9020250

Residential Heat Supply by Waste-Heat Re-Use: Sources, Supply Potential and Demand Coverage—A Case Study

1
Center of Energy, Austrian Institute of Technology, 1220 Vienna, Austria
2
Institute for Structural Engineering, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences Vienna, 1180 Wien, Austria
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 31 October 2016 / Accepted: 25 January 2017 / Published: 10 February 2017
(This article belongs to the Section Sustainable Urban and Rural Development)
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Abstract

This paper deals with climate change mitigation and addresses waste heat reuse as a measure which is until now considered only to a limited extent. The City of Vienna serves as a case study to explore potentials to improve the urban heat supply using waste heat as an additional energy source. As no observation data about waste heat and detailed heating demand is available, this data is derived from proxy data for estimating waste heat reuse potential and residential heating demand patterns. Heat requirements for manufacturing and service provision is explored and, based on the distribution of the companies within the city, mapped as waste heat sources. Employees per company serves as proxy data to allocate the heat volume. Waste heat share and temperature ranges is reviewed from literature. Heating demand is mapped based on floor space of the buildings by age class and building type. Merging supply and demand maps allows to quantify the residential heating demand coverage through local waste heat in the potential supply areas within different distance ranges and housing density classes. In high density housing areas, only a small share of the demand can be covered by waste heat supply even within 250 m distance from sources due to few companies which could provide waste heat. In medium to low density housing areas in Vienna’s outer districts with more industry, a higher share of residential heating demand near the sources can be covered by waste heat within a 250 m distance. Within a 500 m distance, around half of the residential heating demand can be covered only in low density housing areas near the waste heat sources. View Full-Text
Keywords: sustainable cities; renewable energy sources; waste heat use; waste heat distribution; heating demand distribution; heat supply-demand mapping sustainable cities; renewable energy sources; waste heat use; waste heat distribution; heating demand distribution; heat supply-demand mapping
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Loibl, W.; Stollnberger, R.; Österreicher, D. Residential Heat Supply by Waste-Heat Re-Use: Sources, Supply Potential and Demand Coverage—A Case Study. Sustainability 2017, 9, 250.

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