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Sustainability 2017, 9(2), 162; doi:10.3390/su9020162

Decreasing Net Primary Productivity in Response to Urbanization in Liaoning Province, China

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Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory of Geographic Information Science and Technology, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023, China
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Department of Geographic Information Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093, China
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Institute of Applied Ecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016, China
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Collaborative Innovation Center of South China Sea Studies, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093, China
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College of Territorial Resources and Tourism, Anhui Normal University, Wuhu 241000, China
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Edwin Chan
Received: 5 December 2016 / Revised: 10 January 2017 / Accepted: 19 January 2017 / Published: 24 January 2017
(This article belongs to the Section Sustainable Urban and Rural Development)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [32176 KB, uploaded 24 January 2017]   |  

Abstract

Regional ecosystems have been greatly affected by the rapid expansion of urban areas. In order to explore the impact of land use change on net primary productivity (NPP) in rapidly developing cities during the current urbanization process, we quantified land use change in Liaoning province between 2000 and 2010 using net primary productivity as an indicator of ecosystem productivity and health. The Carnegie–Ames–Stanford Approach model was used to estimate NPP by region and land use. We used a unit circle-based evaluation model to quantify local urbanization effects on NPP around eight representative cities. The dominant land use types were farmland, woodland and urban, with urban rapidly replacing farmland. Mean annual NPP and total NPP decreased faster from 2005 to 2010 than from 2000 to 2005, reflecting increasing urbanization rates. The eastern, primarily woodland part of Liaoning province had the greatest reduction in NPP, while the western part, which was primarily farmland and grassland, had the lowest reduction. View Full-Text
Keywords: urbanization; land use change; net primary productivity; Carnegie–Ames–Stanford approach productivity model urbanization; land use change; net primary productivity; Carnegie–Ames–Stanford approach productivity model
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MDPI and ACS Style

Chen, T.; Huang, Q.; Liu, M.; Li, M.; Qu, L.; Deng, S.; Chen, D. Decreasing Net Primary Productivity in Response to Urbanization in Liaoning Province, China. Sustainability 2017, 9, 162.

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