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Sustainability 2017, 9(10), 1816; doi:10.3390/su9101816

Effects of Conservation Tillage and Nutrient Management Practices on Soil Fertility and Productivity of Rice (Oryza sativa L.)–Rice System in North Eastern Region of India

1
ICAR Research Complex for NEH Region, Tripura Centre, Tripura 799210, India
2
Department of Geology and Pedology, Mendel University, 613 00 Brno, Czech Republic
3
Department of Agricultural Sciences, Mediterranean University of Reggio, 89124 Reggio Calabria RC, Italy
4
Ohio State University, Carbon Management and Sequestration Centre, Columbus, OH 43210, USA
5
ICAR Research Complex for NEH Region, Umiam, Meghalaya 793103, India
6
College of Agriculture, Tripura University, Tripura 799022, India
7
Department of Wood Processing, Mendel University, 613 00 Brno, Czech Republic
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 12 September 2017 / Revised: 23 September 2017 / Accepted: 29 September 2017 / Published: 12 October 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Carbon Input into Agricultural Soils)
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Abstract

Over centuries and even today, traditional farming practices are well performed without any ecological degradation. However, management practice such as conservative tillage combined with nutrient and residue could increase the crop production as well as soil fertility. A three-year replicated study was conducted to assess the effects of agronomic modification of traditional farming practices on productivity and sustainability of rice (wet season)–rice (dry season) system (RRS). The replacement of farmers practice (T2) with conservation effective tillage (no-till (NT)) and integrated nutrient management (INM) practice along with 30% residue retention (T5) enhanced the straw, root and biomass yield of both wet season rice (WR), dry season rice (DR) and system as a whole over T2. Treatment T5 recorded significantly lower soil bulk density (ρb) and higher pH than the T2 after three years of the experiment. Further, treatment T5 increased total soil organic carbon (2.8%), total soil organic carbon stock (2.8%), carbon sequestration rate (336.5 kg ha−1 year−1), cumulative carbon stock (142.9%) and carbon retention efficiency (141.0%) over T2 of 0–20 cm depth after three year. The soil microbial biomass carbon concentration was significantly the highest under T5. Similarly, the dehydrogenase activity was the maximum under T5. Adoption of conservation tillage and nutrient management practice involving NT and INM along with residue retention can enhance the system productivity, and C and N sequestration in paddy soils is thereby contributing to the sustainability of the RRS. View Full-Text
Keywords: soil carbon sequestration; rice–rice cropping system; system productivity; conservation tillage; soil quality soil carbon sequestration; rice–rice cropping system; system productivity; conservation tillage; soil quality
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MDPI and ACS Style

Yadav, G.S.; Datta, R.; Imran Pathan, S.; Lal, R.; Meena, R.S.; Babu, S.; Das, A.; Bhowmik, S.N.; Datta, M.; Saha, P.; Mishra, P.K. Effects of Conservation Tillage and Nutrient Management Practices on Soil Fertility and Productivity of Rice (Oryza sativa L.)–Rice System in North Eastern Region of India. Sustainability 2017, 9, 1816.

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