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Sustainability 2014, 6(5), 2961-2973; doi:10.3390/su6052961

Edible Mushroom Cultivation for Food Security and Rural Development in China: Bio-Innovation, Technological Dissemination and Marketing

1
International Center for Ecology, Meteorology, and Environment, School of Applied Meteorology, Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing 210044, China
2
School of Forestry and Wildlife Sciences, Auburn University, AL 36849, USA
3
School of Economics, Tianjin University of Finance and Economics, Tianjin 300222, China
4
College of Economics and Management, Zhejiang Agriculture and Forestry University, Hangzhou 311300, China
5
State Key Laboratory of Forest and Soil Ecology, Institute of Applied Ecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016, China
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 10 April 2014 / Revised: 5 May 2014 / Accepted: 6 May 2014 / Published: 15 May 2014
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Abstract

Mushrooms traditionally collected from forests and now more cultivated have recently become the products of the fifth-largest agricultural sector in China. It was estimated that more than 25 million farmers in China are currently engaged in the collection, cultivation processing and marketing of mushrooms. The total value of mushroom products amounted to 149 billion RMB Yuan (24 billion USD) in 2011. The raw materials have expanded from a few hardwoods to a variety of woods and increasing more into agricultural residues and wastes. The average annual growth rate has been over 10% over the past 30 years in China. This paper describes the rapid growth of mushroom cultivation and its contribution to food security and rural sustainable development. The roles of bio-innovation, technological dissemination, and marketing are also examined. Mushrooms could potentially be very important in future food supplies and in new dimensions of sustainable agriculture and forestry. View Full-Text
Keywords: edible fungi; rural economy; diets; poverty reduction; trade; sustainable agriculture edible fungi; rural economy; diets; poverty reduction; trade; sustainable agriculture
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY 3.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Zhang, Y.; Geng, W.; Shen, Y.; Wang, Y.; Dai, Y.-C. Edible Mushroom Cultivation for Food Security and Rural Development in China: Bio-Innovation, Technological Dissemination and Marketing. Sustainability 2014, 6, 2961-2973.

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