Sustainability 2012, 4(11), 3141-3150; doi:10.3390/su4113141
Article

The Tragedy of the “Tragedy of the Commons”: Why Coining Too Good a Phrase Can Be Dangerous

1,* email, 2email and 2email
Received: 28 August 2012; in revised form: 30 October 2012 / Accepted: 13 November 2012 / Published: 15 November 2012
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Abstract: A deep reading of Hardin (1968) reveals that he had a lot more to say about the use and regulation of resources such as fisheries than he is given credit for in the literature. It appears that he is typically cited just so that authors can use the phrase “tragedy of the commons” to invoke the specter of looming catastrophe and then tie that to whatever solution they have proposed. We argue in this contribution that there is a lot more in Hardin’s essay that either contradicts or greatly complicates the arguments he is cited as an authority for.
Keywords: tragedy of the commons; fisheries economics; individual transferable quotas
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MDPI and ACS Style

Hawkshaw, R.S.; Hawkshaw, S.; Sumaila, U.R. The Tragedy of the “Tragedy of the Commons”: Why Coining Too Good a Phrase Can Be Dangerous. Sustainability 2012, 4, 3141-3150.

AMA Style

Hawkshaw RS, Hawkshaw S, Sumaila UR. The Tragedy of the “Tragedy of the Commons”: Why Coining Too Good a Phrase Can Be Dangerous. Sustainability. 2012; 4(11):3141-3150.

Chicago/Turabian Style

Hawkshaw, Robert S.; Hawkshaw, Sarah; Sumaila, U. R. 2012. "The Tragedy of the “Tragedy of the Commons”: Why Coining Too Good a Phrase Can Be Dangerous." Sustainability 4, no. 11: 3141-3150.

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