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Sustainability 2018, 10(6), 1846; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10061846

Effective Biodiversity Conservation Requires Dynamic, Pluralistic, Partnership-Based Approaches

1
Human Dimensions of Natural Resources, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80521, USA
2
Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, D-07745 Jena, Germany
3
Center for Biodiversity and Conservation, American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY 10024, USA
4
Melanesia Program, Wildlife Conservation Society, Suva, Fiji
5
Natural Resources Institute, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB R3T 2M6, Canada
6
Research Associate, Ngati Awa, Ngati Porou, Wellington 6035, New Zealand
7
Commission on Environmental, Economic, and Social Policy, International Union for the Conservation of Nature, Wellington 6035, New Zealand
8
School of Environmental Studies, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC V8W 2Y2, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 27 April 2018 / Revised: 25 May 2018 / Accepted: 29 May 2018 / Published: 2 June 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biocultural Diversity and Sustainability)
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Abstract

Biodiversity loss undermines the long-term maintenance of ecosystem functions and the well-being of human populations. Global-scale policy initiatives, including the Convention on Biological Diversity, have failed to curb the loss of biodiversity. This failure has led to contentious debates over alternative solutions that represent opposing visions of value-orientations and policy tools at the heart of conservation action. We review these debates and argue that they impede conservation progress by wasting time and resources, overlooking common goals, failing to recognize the need for diverse solutions, and ignoring the central question of who should be involved in the conservation process. Breaking with the polarizing debates, we argue that biocultural approaches to conservation can guide progress toward just and sustainable conservation solutions. We provide examples of the central principles of biocultural conservation, which emphasize the need for pluralistic, partnership-based, and dynamic approaches to conservation. View Full-Text
Keywords: adaptive management and governance; biocultural approaches to conservation; different worldviews and knowledge systems; Gwaii Haanas; nested institutional frameworks; multiple stakeholders and objectives; New Conservation Science; partnerships and relationship building; rights and responsibilities; social-ecological context adaptive management and governance; biocultural approaches to conservation; different worldviews and knowledge systems; Gwaii Haanas; nested institutional frameworks; multiple stakeholders and objectives; New Conservation Science; partnerships and relationship building; rights and responsibilities; social-ecological context
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
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Gavin, M.C.; McCarter, J.; Berkes, F.; Mead, A.T.P.; Sterling, E.J.; Tang, R.; Turner, N.J. Effective Biodiversity Conservation Requires Dynamic, Pluralistic, Partnership-Based Approaches. Sustainability 2018, 10, 1846.

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