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Sustainability 2018, 10(1), 139; doi:10.3390/su10010139

Identifying Sustainable Wood Sources for the Construction Industry: A Case Study

1
School of Civil Engineering, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060, China
2
School of Architecture and Built Environment, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide 5005, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 25 November 2017 / Revised: 17 December 2017 / Accepted: 3 January 2018 / Published: 9 January 2018
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Abstract

Wood is generally considered as a sustainable construction material. However, there are not sufficient wood resources in many countries or regions, especially those short of land resources. These countries and regions have to import wood from overseas. Therefore, it is imperative to determine how to choose sustainable importing sources in order to improve the sustainability performance of using wood in construction. This study compares the sustainability performance of wood imported from different regions by considering wood harvesting, manufacture, and transportation. A framework accounting energy consumption and CO2 emissions is developed for sustainability assessment. The results show that importing wood from Canada, Australia, and New Zealand to Taiwan demands a relatively lower amount of energy than from other regions. Specifically, importing wood from Canada (West) demands the lowest amount of energy (2095 MJ/m3), while importing wood form Brazil consumes the highest amount of energy (5356 MJ/m3). In addition, findings showed that the CO2 emissions generated from importing wood from Sweden are significant lower than those from other regions, although the energy consumed during the importing process is relatively high. The study also revealed that the wood manufacturing process and marine transportation contribute to the most energy consumption and CO2 emissions among all importing processes analysed from most of studied regions. View Full-Text
Keywords: wood; building construction; cross-regional mobility; sustainability; energy consumption; CO2 emissions wood; building construction; cross-regional mobility; sustainability; energy consumption; CO2 emissions
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Li, S.; Wu, H.; Ding, Z. Identifying Sustainable Wood Sources for the Construction Industry: A Case Study. Sustainability 2018, 10, 139.

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