Next Article in Journal
EU Legislation on Forest Plant Health: An Overview with a Focus on Fusarium circinatum
Previous Article in Journal
Effects of Disturbance on Tree Community Dynamics in Whitebark Pine (Pinus albicaulis Engelm.) Ecosystems
Article Menu
Issue 9 (September) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Forests 2018, 9(9), 567; https://doi.org/10.3390/f9090567

Native Plant Diversity and Composition Across a Pinus radiata D.Don Plantation Landscape in South-Central Chile—The Impact of Plantation Age, Logging Roads and Alien Species

1
Department Silviculture and Forest Ecology of the Temperate Zones, University of Goettingen, 37077 Göttingen, Germany
2
Facultad de Ciencias Forestales, Universidad de Concepción, Concepción 3349001, Chile
3
Institute of Ecology and Biodiversity (IEB), Santiago 8320000, Chile
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 18 July 2018 / Revised: 9 September 2018 / Accepted: 12 September 2018 / Published: 14 September 2018
(This article belongs to the Section Forest Ecology and Management)
Full-Text   |   PDF [3896 KB, uploaded 14 September 2018]   |  

Abstract

Alien tree plantations are expanding globally with potential negative effects for native biodiversity. We investigated plant species diversity and composition in a Pinus radiata landscape in south-central Chile, a biodiversity hotspot, by sampling understory vegetation in different plantation age classes, along forest roads and in natural forest remnants in order to find effective conservation measures for native biodiversity. Plantations, including different age classes and roadsides, maintained high native species richness at the landscape scale but supported a completely different community composition than natural forests. Thus, natural forest remnants must be conserved as plantations cannot replace them. Certain natural forest species occurred frequently in mature plantations and can represent starting points for retaining natural elements in plantations. Generalist native and alien species benefited from plantation management, mainly in young plantations and along roadsides. Stand maturation and a closed canopy, though, reduced alien species occurrences within plantations. Along roads, shade-tolerant aliens should be monitored and removed as they can potentially invade natural forests. Native species conservation in plantations requires a holistic approach of the full mosaic of land uses including the protection of remaining natural forests, alien species monitoring along roadsides and patches with continuous canopy cover to reduce pressure by alien species. View Full-Text
Keywords: forest management; forest roads; gamma-diversity; homogenization; age class; forest conservation; stand maturation; indicator species; extinction debt; Nothofagus glauca forest management; forest roads; gamma-diversity; homogenization; age class; forest conservation; stand maturation; indicator species; extinction debt; Nothofagus glauca
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Heinrichs, S.; Pauchard, A.; Schall, P. Native Plant Diversity and Composition Across a Pinus radiata D.Don Plantation Landscape in South-Central Chile—The Impact of Plantation Age, Logging Roads and Alien Species. Forests 2018, 9, 567.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Forests EISSN 1999-4907 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top