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Forests 2017, 8(8), 298; doi:10.3390/f8080298

How Climate Change Will Affect Forest Composition and Forest Operations in Baden-Württemberg—A GIS-Based Case Study Approach

1
Chair of Forest Operations, Albert-Ludwigs-University Freiburg, Werthmannstraße 6, 79085 Freiburg, Germany
2
UMR 1092, AgroParisTech/INRA, Centre de Nancy, 14 rue Girardet, Nancy CEDEX 54042, France
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 6 June 2017 / Revised: 10 August 2017 / Accepted: 13 August 2017 / Published: 16 August 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Forest Operations, Engineering and Management)
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Abstract

In order to accommodate foreseen climate change in European forests, the following are recommended: (i) to increase the number of tree species and the structural diversity; (ii) to replace unsuitable species by native broadleaved tree species, and (iii) to apply close-to-nature silviculture. The state forest department of Baden-Württemberg (BW) currently follows the concept of Forest Development Types (FDTs). However, future climatic conditions will have an impact on these types of forest as well as timber harvesting operations. This Geographic Information System (GIS)-based analysis identified appropriate locations for main FDTs and timber harvesting and extraction methods through the use of species suitability maps, topography, and soil sensitivity data. Based on our findings, the most common FDT in the state forest of BW is expected to be coniferous-beech mixed forests with 29.0% of the total forest area, followed by beech-coniferous (20.5%) and beech-broadleaved (15.4%) mixed forests. Where access for fully mechanized systems is not possible, the main harvesting and extraction methods would be motor manual felling and cable yarding (29.1%). High proportions of large dimensioned trees will require timber extraction using forestry tractors, and these will need to be operated from tractor roads on sensitive soils (23.0%), and from skid trails on insensitive soils (18.4%). View Full-Text
Keywords: forest operations; timber harvesting; timber extraction; forest development types; species suitability map forest operations; timber harvesting; timber extraction; forest development types; species suitability map
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Berendt, F.; Fortin, M.; Jaeger, D.; Schweier, J. How Climate Change Will Affect Forest Composition and Forest Operations in Baden-Württemberg—A GIS-Based Case Study Approach. Forests 2017, 8, 298.

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