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Forests 2017, 8(5), 157; doi:10.3390/f8050157

Understanding Ecosystem Service Preferences across Residential Classifications near Mt. Baker Snoqualmie National Forest, Washington (USA)

1
Department of Forest Ecosystems and Society, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331, USA
2
Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331, USA
3
U.S. Forest Service, PNW Research Lab, Seattle, WA 98103, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Ir. Kris Verheyen
Received: 28 February 2017 / Revised: 21 April 2017 / Accepted: 2 May 2017 / Published: 6 May 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Management Strategies for Forest Ecosystem Services)
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Abstract

Ecosystem services consistently group together both spatially and cognitively into “bundles”. Understanding socio-economic predictors of these bundles is essential to informing a management approach that emphasizes equitable distribution of ecosystem services. We received 1796 completed surveys from stakeholders of the Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest (WA, USA) using both in-person workshops and an online platform. Survey respondents rated the importance of 26 ecosystem services. Subsequent analysis revealed six distinct preference bundles of these services: environmental quality, utilitarian values, heritage values, two types of recreational values, and access and roads. Results suggest that the conceptualizations of these bundles are consistent across socio-demographic groups. Resource agencies that seek to frame dialogue around critical values may want to consider these broadly representative bundle sets as a meaningful organizing framework that would resonate with diverse constituents. View Full-Text
Keywords: ecosystem services; forest management; values; preferences; urban; rural ecosystem services; forest management; values; preferences; urban; rural
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Williams, K.; Biedenweg, K.; Cerveny, L. Understanding Ecosystem Service Preferences across Residential Classifications near Mt. Baker Snoqualmie National Forest, Washington (USA). Forests 2017, 8, 157.

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