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Forests 2016, 7(8), 171; doi:10.3390/f7080171

Aftermath of Mountain Pine Beetle Outbreak in British Columbia: Stand Dynamics, Management Response and Ecosystem Resilience

1
Okanagan Institute for Biodiversity, Resilience, and Ecosystem Services (BRAES), University of British Columbia, Okanagan Campus, 1177 Research Road, Kelowna, BC V1V 1V7, Canada
2
Yukon Research Centre, Whitehorse, YK Y1A 5K4, Canada
Present address: Department of Renewable Resources, University of Alberta, 847 General Services Bldg, Edmonton, AB T6G 2H1, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Jarmo K. Holopainen and Timothy A. Martin
Received: 9 June 2016 / Revised: 20 July 2016 / Accepted: 2 August 2016 / Published: 5 August 2016
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [1595 KB, uploaded 9 August 2016]   |  

Abstract

The mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins) (MPB) has infested and killed millions of hectares of lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta var. latifolia Engelm) forests in British Columbia, Canada, over the past decade. It is now spreading out of its native range into the Canadian boreal forest, with unknown social, economic and ecological consequences. This review explores the ramifications of the MPB epidemic with respect to mid-term timber supply, forest growth, structure and composition, vegetation diversity, forest fire, climate change, and ecosystem resilience. Research confirms that, in British Columbia, all of these variables are more significantly impacted when salvage logging is used as management response to the outbreak. We conclude that appropriate management in response to MPB is essential to ensuring ecologically resilient future forests and reliable mid-term timber supplies for affected human communities. We highlight knowledge gaps and avenues for research to advance our understanding in support of sustainable post-disturbance forest management policies in British Columbia and elsewhere. View Full-Text
Keywords: climate change; forest disturbance; forest resilience; mid-term timber supply; stand dynamics climate change; forest disturbance; forest resilience; mid-term timber supply; stand dynamics
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Dhar, A.; Parrott, L.; Hawkins, C.D. Aftermath of Mountain Pine Beetle Outbreak in British Columbia: Stand Dynamics, Management Response and Ecosystem Resilience. Forests 2016, 7, 171.

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