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Forests 2016, 7(12), 291; doi:10.3390/f7120291

The Biodiversity of Urban and Peri-Urban Forests and the Diverse Ecosystem Services They Provide as Socio-Ecological Systems

1
School of Ecosystem and Forest Science, Faculty of Science, Burnley campus, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3121, Australia
2
Functional and Ecosystem Ecology Unit, Faculty of Natural Sciences and Mathematics, Universidad del Rosario, Kr 26 No. 63B-48, Bogotá D.C. 111221492, Colombia
3
School of Forestry, College of Engineering, The University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 21 October 2016 / Revised: 3 November 2016 / Accepted: 6 November 2016 / Published: 24 November 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban and Periurban Forest Diversity and Ecosystem Services)
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Abstract

Urban and peri-urban forests provide a variety of ecosystem service benefits for urban society. Recognising and understanding the many human–tree interactions that urban forests provide may be more complex but probably just as important to our urbanised society. This paper introduces four themes that link the studies from across the globe presented in this Special Issue: (1) human–tree interactions; (2) urban tree inequity; (3) carbon sequestration in our own neighbourhoods; and (4) biodiversity of urban forests themselves and the fauna they support. Urban forests can help tackle many of the “wicked problems” that confront our towns and cities and the people that live in them. For urban forests to be accepted as an effective element of any urban adaptation strategy, we need to improve the communication of these ecosystem services and disservices and provide evidence of the benefits provided to urban society and individuals, as well as the biodiversity with which we share our town and cities. View Full-Text
Keywords: urban ecology; urban landscape; climate change adaptation; climate change mitigation; tree canopy cover; urban planning urban ecology; urban landscape; climate change adaptation; climate change mitigation; tree canopy cover; urban planning
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Livesley, S.J.; Escobedo, F.J.; Morgenroth, J. The Biodiversity of Urban and Peri-Urban Forests and the Diverse Ecosystem Services They Provide as Socio-Ecological Systems. Forests 2016, 7, 291.

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