Next Article in Journal
Comparing ALS and Image-Based Point Cloud Metrics and Modelled Forest Inventory Attributes in a Complex Coastal Forest Environment
Previous Article in Journal
Michelotti, L. A. and Miesel J. R. Source Material and Concentration of Wildfire-Produced Pyrogenic Carbon Influence Post-Fire Soil Nutrient Dynamics. Forests 2015, 6, 1325–1342
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Forests 2015, 6(10), 3686-3703; doi:10.3390/f6103686

Influence of Rhizobia Inoculation on Biomass Gain and Tissue Nitrogen Content of Leucaena leucocephala Seedlings under Drought

1
Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry, Hans-Knöll-str. 10, 07745 Jena, Germany
2
Institute of Geography, Faculty of Chemical and Earth Sciences, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena, Löbdergraben 32, 07743 Jena, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Reynaldo Campos Santana and Eric J. Jokela
Received: 25 June 2015 / Revised: 7 September 2015 / Accepted: 10 October 2015 / Published: 15 October 2015
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [189 KB, uploaded 19 October 2015]   |  

Abstract

Anticipated increases in the frequency of heat waves and drought spells may have negative effects on the ability of leguminous trees to fix nitrogen (N). In seedlings of Leucaena leucocephala inoculated with Mesorhizobium loti or Rhizobium tropici, we investigated how the developmental stage and a short drought influenced overall biomass and the accumulation of carbon and N in plant tissues. In early developmental stages, the number of nodules and nodule biomass were correlated with total plant biomass and δ15N, and nodules and roots contributed 33%–35% of the seedling total N. Seedlings associated with R. tropici fixed more N and exhibited higher overall biomass compared with M. loti seedlings. Four and a half months after inoculation (140 days after inoculation, DAI), a short (15-day) drought inhibited seedling growth and caused a decline in total plant N, with the smallest decline in R. tropici seedlings. After 15 days of drought, i.e., 155 DAI, the nodules had accumulated proline, but the total amino acid concentration did not change. Our results indicate that N-fixation is independent of seedlings growth. In addition, R. tropici is a better choice than M. loti as a symbiont for Leucaena seedlings for forest restoration and agroforestry applications under increasingly drier conditions. View Full-Text
Keywords: symbiosis; nodulation; nitrogen fixation; Rhizobium tropici; Mesorhizobium loti; reforestation; 15N abundance; agroforestry symbiosis; nodulation; nitrogen fixation; Rhizobium tropici; Mesorhizobium loti; reforestation; 15N abundance; agroforestry
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Pereyra, G.; Hartmann, H.; Michalzik, B.; Ziegler, W.; Trumbore, S. Influence of Rhizobia Inoculation on Biomass Gain and Tissue Nitrogen Content of Leucaena leucocephala Seedlings under Drought. Forests 2015, 6, 3686-3703.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Forests EISSN 1999-4907 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top