Next Article in Journal
Redefining Secondary Forests in the Mexican Forest Code: Implications for Management, Restoration, and Conservation
Previous Article in Journal
Analysis of the Influence of Plot Size and LiDAR Density on Forest Structure Attribute Estimates
Forests 2014, 5(5), 952-977; doi:10.3390/f5050952
Article

Contribution of Small-Scale Gum and Resin Commercialization to Local Livelihood and Rural Economic Development in the Drylands of Eastern Africa

1,2,3,* , 1
, 2
 and 4
1 Institute of International Forestry and Forest Products, Technische Universität Dresden, Pienner Str. Tharandt 7, 01737 Tharandt, Germany 2 Department of Land, Environment, Agriculture and Forestry (TESAF), University of Padova, Via dell'Universita' 16, Legnaro 35020, Italy 3 Department of Natural Resource Management, University of Gondar, P.O. Box 1422 Gondar, Ethiopia 4 Faculty of Natural Resources and Environmental Studies, Kordofan University, Gama'a Str.517 Elobied, Sudan
* Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 13 February 2014 / Revised: 19 April 2014 / Accepted: 7 May 2014 / Published: 16 May 2014
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [1309 KB, uploaded 16 May 2014]   |   Browse Figures

Abstract

This paper examines the extent to which the economic gains derived from gum and resin commercialization impact rural livelihood improvement under different resource management regimes in the drylands of Ethiopia and Sudan. Primary data were collected through semi-structured interviews with 240 randomly selected small-scale producers in four regions with gradients of resource management regimes. The survey was supplemented by secondary data, group discussions and key informant interviews. In the four regions, gum and resin income contributes to 14%–23% of the small-scale producers’ household income. Absolute income was positively correlated with resource management regime and commercialization level. It was higher from cultivated resources on private lands, followed by regulated access to wild resources. In open-access resources, the producers’ income was the lowest, although accessed by the poor and women. However, dependence on gum and resin was higher in open-access resource areas. Households’ socioeconomic characteristics, resource access, production and marketing variables determining income from gum and resin were identified and their variation across the cases is discussed. Overall, gum and resin commercialization in the study areas play a potential poverty alleviation role as a source of regular income, a safety net, and a means of helping producers move out of poverty.
Keywords: gums and resins; livelihood; poverty alleviation; resource management regime; Ethiopia and Sudan gums and resins; livelihood; poverty alleviation; resource management regime; Ethiopia and Sudan
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Share & Cite This Article

Export to BibTeX |
EndNote


MDPI and ACS Style

Abtew, A.A.; Pretzsch, J.; Secco, L.; Mohamod, T.E. Contribution of Small-Scale Gum and Resin Commercialization to Local Livelihood and Rural Economic Development in the Drylands of Eastern Africa. Forests 2014, 5, 952-977.

View more citation formats

Article Metrics

Comments

Citing Articles

[Return to top]
Forests EISSN 1999-4907 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert