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Materials 2016, 9(5), 328; doi:10.3390/ma9050328

Effect of Storage in Distilled Water for Three Months on the Antimicrobial Properties of Poly(methyl methacrylate) Denture Base Material Doped with Inorganic Filler

1
Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Institute of Engineering Materials and Biomaterials, Silesian University of Technology, ul. Konarskiego 18a, Gliwice 44-100, Poland
2
Chair and Department of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine with the Division of Dentistry in Zabrze, Medical University of Silesia in Katowice, Jordana 19, Zabrze 41-808, Poland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Carla Renata Arciola
Received: 23 February 2016 / Revised: 26 April 2016 / Accepted: 27 April 2016 / Published: 29 April 2016
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Abstract

The colonization of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) denture base materials by pathogenic microorganisms is a major problem associated with the use of prostheses, and the incorporation of antimicrobial fillers is a method of improving the antimicrobial properties of these materials. Numerous studies have demonstrated the initial in vitro antimicrobial effectiveness of this type of material; however, reports demonstrating the stability of these fillers over longer periods are not available. In this study, silver sodium hydrogen zirconium phosphate was introduced into the powder component of a PMMA denture base material at concentrations of 0.25%, 0.5%, 1%, 2%, 4%, and 8% (w/w). The survival rates of the gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus, gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli and yeast-type fungus Candida albicans were established after fungal or bacterial suspensions were incubated with samples that had been previously stored in distilled water. Storage over a three-month period led to the progressive reduction of the initial antimicrobial properties. The results of this study suggest that additional microbiological tests should be conducted for materials that are treated with antimicrobial fillers and intended for long-term use. Future long-term studies of the migration of silver ions from the polymer matrix and the influence of different media on this ion emission are required. View Full-Text
Keywords: denture base material; antibacterial properties; antifungal properties; aging; antimicrobial filler; silver denture base material; antibacterial properties; antifungal properties; aging; antimicrobial filler; silver
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Chladek, G.; Basa, K.; Mertas, A.; Pakieła, W.; Żmudzki, J.; Bobela, E.; Król, W. Effect of Storage in Distilled Water for Three Months on the Antimicrobial Properties of Poly(methyl methacrylate) Denture Base Material Doped with Inorganic Filler. Materials 2016, 9, 328.

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