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Materials 2015, 8(8), 5098-5111; doi:10.3390/ma8085098

Effect of Industrial By-Products on Unconfined Compressive Strength of Solidified Organic Marine Clayey Soils

1
Department of Rural Construction Engineering, Kongju National University, Yesan 143-701, Korea
2
Institute of Agriculture & Life Science, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701, Korea
3
Laboratory of Soil and Water Engineering, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 8th street, Troy, NY 12180, USA
4
Department of Agricultural Engineering, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701, Korea
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Jorge de Brito
Received: 25 April 2015 / Revised: 19 July 2015 / Accepted: 31 July 2015 / Published: 7 August 2015
(This article belongs to the Section Advanced Composites)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [3394 KB, uploaded 7 August 2015]   |  

Abstract

The use of industrial by-products as admixture to ASTM Type I cement (ordinary Portland cement (OPC)) was investigated with the objective of improving the solidification of organic marine clayey soils. The industrial by-products considered in this paper were oyster-shell powder (OSP), steelmaking slag dust (SMS) and fuel-gas-desulfurized (FGD) gypsum. The industrial by-products were added to OPC at a ratio of 5% based on dry weight to produce a mixture used to solidify organic marine clayey soils. The dosage ratios of mixtures to organic marine clayey soils were 5, 10 and 15% on a dry weight basis. Unconfined compressive strength (UCS) test after 28 days revealed that the highest strength was obtained with the OPC + SMS 15% mixing ratio. The UCS of specimens treated with this mixture was >500 kPa, compared with 300 kPa for specimens treated with a 15% OPC + OSP mixture and 200 kPa when 15% of OPC was used alone. These results were attributed to the more active hydration and pozzolanic reaction of the OPC + SMS mixture. This hypothesis was verified through X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analyses, and was confirmed by variations in the calcium carbonate (CaCO3) content of the materials during curing. View Full-Text
Keywords: organic marine clayey soils; solidification agents; admixture; steelmaking slag; unconfined compressive strength organic marine clayey soils; solidification agents; admixture; steelmaking slag; unconfined compressive strength
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Park, C.-G.; Yun, S.-W.; Baveye, P.C.; Yu, C. Effect of Industrial By-Products on Unconfined Compressive Strength of Solidified Organic Marine Clayey Soils. Materials 2015, 8, 5098-5111.

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