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Materials 2014, 7(8), 5866-5882; doi:10.3390/ma7085866

Effect of Mucin and Bicarbonate Ion on Corrosion Behavior of AZ31 Magnesium Alloy for Airway Stents

1
Engineering Research Center for Revolutionizing Metallic Biomaterials (ERC-RMB), North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University, 1601 E. Market St, IRC RM 119, Greensboro, NC 27411, USA
2
Department of Animal Sciences, North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University, 1601 E. Market St, Greensboro, NC 27411, USA
3
ACell Inc., 6640 Eli Whitney Drive, Suite 200, Columbia, MD 21046, USA
These authors contributed equally to this work.
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 14 June 2014 / Revised: 17 July 2014 / Accepted: 7 August 2014 / Published: 15 August 2014
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Light Alloys and Their Applications)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [5425 KB, uploaded 15 August 2014]   |  

Abstract

The biodegradable ability of magnesium alloys is an attractive feature for tracheal stents since they can be absorbed by the body through gradual degradation after healing of the airway structure, which can reduce the risk of inflammation caused by long-term implantation and prevent the repetitive surgery for removal of existing stent. In this study, the effects of bicarbonate ion (HCO3) and mucin in Gamble’s solution on the corrosion behavior of AZ31 magnesium alloy were investigated, using immersion and electrochemical tests to systematically identify the biodegradation kinetics of magnesium alloy under in vitro environment, mimicking the epithelial mucus surfaces in a trachea for development of biodegradable airway stents. Analysis of corrosion products after immersion test was performed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used to identify the effects of bicarbonate ions and mucin on the corrosion behavior of AZ31 magnesium alloys with the temporal change of corrosion resistance. The results show that the increase of the bicarbonate ions in Gamble’s solution accelerates the dissolution of AZ31 magnesium alloy, while the addition of mucin retards the corrosion. The experimental data in this work is intended to be used as foundational knowledge to predict the corrosion behavior of AZ31 magnesium alloy in the airway environment while providing degradation information for future in vivo studies. View Full-Text
Keywords: biodegradable metal; magnesium; corrosion; tracheal stent; Gamble’s solution; mucin; bicarbonate ion biodegradable metal; magnesium; corrosion; tracheal stent; Gamble’s solution; mucin; bicarbonate ion
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY 3.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Jang, Y.; Owuor, D.; Waterman, J.T.; White, L.; Collins, B.; Sankar, J.; Gilbert, T.W.; Yun, Y. Effect of Mucin and Bicarbonate Ion on Corrosion Behavior of AZ31 Magnesium Alloy for Airway Stents. Materials 2014, 7, 5866-5882.

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