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Energies 2017, 10(7), 956; doi:10.3390/en10070956

Linking the Power and Transport Sectors—Part 1: The Principle of Sector Coupling

1
Institute of Electrochemical Process Engineering (IEK-3), Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Wilhelm-Johnen-Street, 52428 Jülich, Germany
2
Chair of Fuel Cells, RWTH Aachen University, c/o Institute of Electrochemical Process Engineering (IEK-3), Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Wilhelm-Johnen-Street, 52428 Jülich, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 29 March 2017 / Revised: 4 July 2017 / Accepted: 6 July 2017 / Published: 21 July 2017
(This article belongs to the Section Electrical Power and Energy System)
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Abstract

The usage of renewable energy sources (RESs) to achieve greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reduction goals requires a holistic transformation across all sectors. Due to the fluctuating nature of RESs, it is necessary to install more wind and photovoltaics (PVs) generation in terms of nominal power than would otherwise be required in order to ensure that the power demand can always be met. In a near fully RES-based energy system, there will be times when there is an inadequate conventional load to meet the overcapacity of RESs, which will lead to demand regularly being exceeded and thereby a surplus. One approach to making productive use of this surplus, which would lead to a holistic transformation of all sectors, is “sector coupling” (SC). This paper describes the general principles behind this concept and develops a working definition intended to be of utility to the international scientific community. Furthermore, a literature review provides an overview of relevant scientific papers on the topic. Due to the challenge of distinguishing between papers with or without SC, the approach adopted here takes the German context as a case study that can be applied to future reviews with an international focus. Finally, to evaluate the potential of SC, an analysis of the linking of the power and transport sectors on a worldwide, EU and German level has been conducted and is outlined here. View Full-Text
Keywords: sector coupling (SC); linking the sectors; power-to-gas; power-to-fuel; power-to-heat; transport sector sector coupling (SC); linking the sectors; power-to-gas; power-to-fuel; power-to-heat; transport sector
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Robinius, M.; Otto, A.; Heuser, P.; Welder, L.; Syranidis, K.; Ryberg, D.S.; Grube, T.; Markewitz, P.; Peters, R.; Stolten, D. Linking the Power and Transport Sectors—Part 1: The Principle of Sector Coupling. Energies 2017, 10, 956.

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