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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13(9), 874; doi:10.3390/ijerph13090874

Ambient Concentrations of Metabolic Disrupting Chemicals and Children’s Academic Achievement in El Paso, Texas

1
Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Northeastern University, 360 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA
2
Department of Sociology and Anthropology, University of Texas at El Paso, 500 West University Avenue, El Paso, TX 79902, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Received: 30 June 2016 / Revised: 17 August 2016 / Accepted: 24 August 2016 / Published: 1 September 2016
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [703 KB, uploaded 1 September 2016]   |  

Abstract

Concerns about children’s weight have steadily risen alongside the manufacture and use of myriad chemicals in the US. One class of chemicals, known as metabolic disruptors, interfere with human endocrine and metabolic functioning and are of specific concern to children’s health and development. This article examines the effect of residential concentrations of metabolic disrupting chemicals on children’s school performance for the first time. Census tract-level ambient concentrations for known metabolic disruptors come from the US Environmental Protection Agency’s National Air Toxics Assessment. Other measures were drawn from a survey of primary caretakers of 4th and 5th grade children in El Paso Independent School District (El Paso, TX, USA). A mediation model is employed to examine two hypothetical pathways through which the ambient level of metabolic disruptors at a child’s home might affect grade point average. Results indicate that concentrations of metabolic disruptors are statistically significantly associated with lower grade point averages directly and indirectly through body mass index. Findings from this study have practical implications for environmental justice research and chemical policy reform in the US. View Full-Text
Keywords: environmental justice; body mass index; obesity; obesogen; children; academic achievement; metabolic disruptors; endocrine disrupting chemicals; NATA environmental justice; body mass index; obesity; obesogen; children; academic achievement; metabolic disruptors; endocrine disrupting chemicals; NATA
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Clark-Reyna, S.E.; Grineski, S.E.; Collins, T.W. Ambient Concentrations of Metabolic Disrupting Chemicals and Children’s Academic Achievement in El Paso, Texas. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13, 874.

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