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Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(2), 308; doi:10.3390/ijms18020308

Next-Generation Sequencing in Oncology: Genetic Diagnosis, Risk Prediction and Cancer Classification

1
Department of Clinical Genetics: GROW—School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, 6229HX Maastricht, The Netherlands
2
Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics: GROW—School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, 6229HX Maastricht, The Netherlands
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 15 December 2016 / Accepted: 19 January 2017 / Published: 31 January 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Next-Generation Sequencing for Clinical Application)
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Abstract

Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology has expanded in the last decades with significant improvements in the reliability, sequencing chemistry, pipeline analyses, data interpretation and costs. Such advances make the use of NGS feasible in clinical practice today. This review describes the recent technological developments in NGS applied to the field of oncology. A number of clinical applications are reviewed, i.e., mutation detection in inherited cancer syndromes based on DNA-sequencing, detection of spliceogenic variants based on RNA-sequencing, DNA-sequencing to identify risk modifiers and application for pre-implantation genetic diagnosis, cancer somatic mutation analysis, pharmacogenetics and liquid biopsy. Conclusive remarks, clinical limitations, implications and ethical considerations that relate to the different applications are provided. View Full-Text
Keywords: next-generation sequencing; whole-exome-sequencing; whole-genome-sequencing; gene-panel; inherited cancer syndrome; cancer somatic mutation; diagnostics; genetic modifiers; theranostics next-generation sequencing; whole-exome-sequencing; whole-genome-sequencing; gene-panel; inherited cancer syndrome; cancer somatic mutation; diagnostics; genetic modifiers; theranostics
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Kamps, R.; Brandão, R.D.; Bosch, B.J.; Paulussen, A.D.C.; Xanthoulea, S.; Blok, M.J.; Romano, A. Next-Generation Sequencing in Oncology: Genetic Diagnosis, Risk Prediction and Cancer Classification. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18, 308.

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