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Healthcare 2016, 4(2), 28; doi:10.3390/healthcare4020028

Person-Centered, Physical Activity for Patients with Low Back Pain: Piloting Service Delivery

1
Department of Health Sciences, University of St Mark and St John, Plymouth PL11 8BH, UK
2
London Sport Institute, Middlesex University, London NW4 4BT, UK
3
Plymouth Hospitals NHS Trust, Plymouth PL6 8DH, UK
4
Plymouth Community Back Pain Service, Stoke Surgery, Belmont Villas, Stoke, Plymouth PL3 4DP, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Robert J. Gatchel
Received: 25 February 2016 / Revised: 26 April 2016 / Accepted: 10 May 2016 / Published: 18 May 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Low Back Pain: Recent Advances And Perspectives)
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Abstract

Low back pain (LBP) is one of the most common and costly conditions in industrialized countries. Exercise therapy has been used to treat LBP, although typically using only one mode of exercise. This paper describes the method and initial findings of a person-centered, group physical activity programme which featured as part of a multidisciplinary approach to treating LBP. Six participants (aged 50.7 ± 17 years) completed a six-week physical activity programme lasting two hours per week. A multicomponent approach to physical activity was adopted which included aerobic fitness, core activation, muscular strength and endurance, Nordic Walking, flexibility and exercise gaming. In addition, participants were required to use diary sheets to record physical activity completed at home. Results revealed significant (p < 0.05) improvements in back strength (23%), aerobic fitness (23%), negative wellbeing (32%) and disability (16%). Person’s Correlation Coefficient analysis revealed significant (p < 0.05) relationships between improvement in perceived pain and aerobic fitness (r = 0.93). It was concluded that a person-centered, multicomponent approach to physical activity may be optimal for supporting patients who self-manage LBP. View Full-Text
Keywords: low back pain; physical activity; disability; self-management; well-being; physical fitness low back pain; physical activity; disability; self-management; well-being; physical fitness
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Bloxham, S.; Barter, P.; Scragg, S.; Peers, C.; Jane, B.; Layden, J. Person-Centered, Physical Activity for Patients with Low Back Pain: Piloting Service Delivery. Healthcare 2016, 4, 28.

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