Special Issue "Urban Water Policy and Planning Strategies for an Uncertain Water Future"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Urban Water Management".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. David Sampson
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Decision Centre for a Desert City, Arizona State University, 878209 Tempe, AZ, USA
Interests: water law and policy; decision making; algorithm development; urban water use

Special Issue Information

Dear colleagues,

Urban water utilities throughout the United States face multiple challenges to delivering safe, affordable potable water to their customers. These challenges have both natural and anthropogenic drivers and include water quality issues and water supply availability (including stormwater management and flood control), all of which may be exacerbated by aging water supply infrastructure. The specific challenges faced by any one water service provider depend on several factors, but user behavioral characteristics, climatic variability and change, infrastructure capacity and condition, and population shifts are common. To meet these challenges, water planners and water utility managers must plan for an uncertain water future. The specific policies and planning needed greatly depends on the geographical location and context. Water quality challenges for account deliveries may be met by improvements to filtration and water treatment (limited only by monetary considerations), while water supply challenges can only be met by conservation, the improved efficiency of water use, new green infrastructure for stormwater capture and use (or discharge), and perhaps increased storage capacity. This Special Issue of the journal Water will accept papers that address current and novel water policy strategies that seek to meet these water quality, water quantity, and infrastructure challenges. New research focused on either empirical or modeling methods and analyses will be considered for this Special Issue.

Dr. David Sampson
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • growth
  • climate change
  • alternative water supplies
  • rainwater harvested
  • gray water
  • infrastructure

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle
Development of a Heterogeneity Analysis Framework for Collaborative Sponge City Management
Water 2019, 11(10), 1995; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11101995 - 25 Sep 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Rapid urbanization, inappropriate urban planning and the changing climate in many countries have resulted in flooding, water shortage and water pollution around the world. Although the sponge city concept has been applied in both macro-scales and micro-scales to address those challenges, research on [...] Read more.
Rapid urbanization, inappropriate urban planning and the changing climate in many countries have resulted in flooding, water shortage and water pollution around the world. Although the sponge city concept has been applied in both macro-scales and micro-scales to address those challenges, research on the heterogeneity of different cities for sponge city construction and the collaborative management between cities is insufficient. Therefore, this paper proposes a multivariate cluster analysis framework and conducts an empirical study using 96 Chinese cities. By considering the local infrastructure, economic development, water resource distribution, water quality and precipitation characteristics in each city, and integrating the principal component analysis and a self-organizing feature mapping network, this paper shows the potential of regional and interregional sponge city collaborative management. This will provide an opportunity for developing a new sponge city management mechanism and will promote the establishment of multi-functional departments for urban flood control and water quality improvement. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Economic Evaluation of Adaptation Pathways for an Urban Drainage System Experiencing Deep Uncertainty
Water 2019, 11(3), 531; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11030531 - 14 Mar 2019
Abstract
As Decision Making under Deep Uncertainty methodologies are becoming more widely utilised, there has been a growth in the use and generation of Adaptation Pathways. These are meant to convey to policy makers how short-term adaptations can act as elements of longer-term adaptation [...] Read more.
As Decision Making under Deep Uncertainty methodologies are becoming more widely utilised, there has been a growth in the use and generation of Adaptation Pathways. These are meant to convey to policy makers how short-term adaptations can act as elements of longer-term adaptation strategies. However, sets of Adaptation Pathways do not convey the individual pathway’s relative costs and benefits. To address this problem in relation to urban pluvial flooding, an economic analysis of a set of Adaptation Pathways was conducted. Initially, a methodology to conduct an economic assessment for deterministic climate change scenarios is developed. This methodology is then modified, using methods that underpin real options to assess how a pathway performs across a bundle of possible futures. This delivered information on how the performance of adaptations can vary across different climate change scenarios. By comparing the deterministic analysis to the new method, it was found that the order in which options are implemented greatly affects the financial performance of an Adaptation Pathway, even if the final combination of options is identical. The presented methodology has the potential to greatly improve decision making by informing policy makers on the potential performance of adaptation strategies being considered. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessFeature PaperReview
It Is Not Easy Being Green: Recognizing Unintended Consequences of Green Stormwater Infrastructure
Water 2020, 12(2), 522; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12020522 (registering DOI) - 13 Feb 2020
Abstract
Green infrastructure designed to address urban drainage and water quality issues is often deployed without full knowledge of potential unintended social, ecological, and human health consequences. Though understood in their respective fields of study, these diverse impacts are seldom discussed together in a [...] Read more.
Green infrastructure designed to address urban drainage and water quality issues is often deployed without full knowledge of potential unintended social, ecological, and human health consequences. Though understood in their respective fields of study, these diverse impacts are seldom discussed together in a format understood by a broader audience. This paper takes a first step in addressing that gap by exploring tradeoffs associated with green infrastructure practices that manage urban stormwater including urban trees, stormwater ponds, filtration, infiltration, rain gardens, and green roofs. Each green infrastructure practice type performs best under specific conditions and when targeting specific goals, but regular inspections, maintenance, and monitoring are necessary for any green stormwater infrastructure (GSI) practice to succeed. We review how each of the above practices is intended to function and how they could malfunction in order to improve how green stormwater infrastructure is designed, constructed, monitored, and maintained. Our proposed decision-making framework, using both biophysical (biological and physical) science and social science, could lead to GSI projects that are effective, cost efficient, and just. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop