Special Issue "Latest Advances in Urban Stormwater Pollution Management"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Urban Water Management".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2022 | Viewed by 1727

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Terry Lucke
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Civil Engineering, Charles Sturt University, Bathurst, NSW, Australia
Interests: constructed floating wetlands; stormwater management; bioretention systems; permeable pavements; water sensitive urban design
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Chris Walker
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
STEM, University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia
Interests: constructed floating wetlands; stormwater management; wetland systems; nature-based systems; water sensitive urban design; urban catchment management

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

There have been many changes in urban stormwater management in the last two decades due to the implementation of Low Impact Development and other policies and practices. These include new stormwater treatment practices in response to new planning regulations, changes to community practices relating to stormwater pollution runoff, fertiliser application, animal faeces, and the development of more sustainable vehicles and fuels.

This Special Edition entitled “Latest Advances in Urban Stormwater Pollution Management” aims to highlight research on improvements in urban stormwater management practices and technologies that have led to reduced stormwater pollution. This can include research studies on the effects of new policies, new catchment management practices, new stormwater treatment devices, advances in computer modelling, and other relevant topics.

Dr. Terry Lucke
Dr. Chris Walker
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • stormwater pollution
  • low impact development
  • stormwater treatment
  • stormwater management

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Article
Evolution of Surface Drainage Network for Spoil Heaps under Simulated Rainfall
Water 2021, 13(23), 3475; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13233475 - 06 Dec 2021
Viewed by 875
Abstract
Spoil heaps laid from the infrastructure building sites or the mining sites are confoundedly prone to accelerated soil erosion and inducing debris flows on extreme rainfall occasion, thus threatening water quality and personal safety. In present study, the roughness and drainage network evolution [...] Read more.
Spoil heaps laid from the infrastructure building sites or the mining sites are confoundedly prone to accelerated soil erosion and inducing debris flows on extreme rainfall occasion, thus threatening water quality and personal safety. In present study, the roughness and drainage network evolution of the loess spoil heap (a 33° slope gradient) were investigated via indoor simulation experiment under three rainfall intensities (60, 90, and 120 mm/h). A detailed scan of the slope using laser scanner, topographic analysis based on ArcGIS software, and statistical analyses were the main methods utilized in the study. The results showed that surface roughness increased with cumulative rainfall. For three rainfall intensity treatments, the proneness of shallow landslide under 90 mm/h intensity resulted in the largest roughness. The drainage density and stream frequency of the spoil heap slope both decreased with cumulative rainfall and negatively correlated with surface roughness, which indicated the convergence of the drainage network. Meanwhile, the individual flow paths presented an increasing sinuosity and a decreasing gradient with cumulative rainfall. However, drainage network features varied in a less marked degree during different rainfall intensities, showing comparable fractal dimensions of 1.350–1.454, 1.305–1.459, and 1.292–1.455 for the three rainfall intensities. Evaluating the response of four hydrodynamic characteristics of runoff to the drainage network evolution, stream power was found to be most sensitive. The linearity of the relationships between stream power and drainage density and that between stream sinuosity and gradient were estimated to have R2 between 0.961 and 0.979. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Latest Advances in Urban Stormwater Pollution Management)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
The Impact of Precipitation Characteristics on the Washout of Pollutants Based on the Example of an Urban Catchment in Kielce
Water 2021, 13(22), 3187; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13223187 - 11 Nov 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 447
Abstract
This paper reports the results of studies on the concentrations of total suspended solids (TSS) and heavy metals (HMs) (Cu, Zn, Cr, Ni, Cd, Pb) in stormwater. Pollutant loads were calculated for the observed high water stages. Pollutographs showing M/Mc = f [...] Read more.
This paper reports the results of studies on the concentrations of total suspended solids (TSS) and heavy metals (HMs) (Cu, Zn, Cr, Ni, Cd, Pb) in stormwater. Pollutant loads were calculated for the observed high water stages. Pollutographs showing M/Mc = f(V/Vc) relationships were generated. In the description of the relationships, two functions, namely the exponential and the power functions, were employed. These represented the dynamics of the pollutant washout from the surface of the catchment area. The analyses demonstrated that the exponential function provides a slightly better description of the course of the process compared with the power function. In the former case, correlation coefficients (R) ranged from 0.900 to 0.999, whereas in the latter they ranged from 0.864 to 0.999. The analyses of correlations between the characteristics describing discharge hydrographs and the values of pollutant washout coefficients indicate that the strongest statistical relationships were identified for TSS. It was demonstrated that the value of the washout coefficient for total suspended solids (kTSS) drops with an increase in rain intensity (q). This also depends on the 10-min precipitation (Ptd=10). Regarding the studied heavy metals, a statistically significant impact of the dry period (tbd) on the washout coefficient was observed only for lead (kPb). Taking into account the washout coefficient in the first flush model makes it possible to improve the accuracy of calculations. This is important for understanding the studied phenomenon. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Latest Advances in Urban Stormwater Pollution Management)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop