Biochar Based Soil Water Treatment

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Wastewater Treatment and Reuse".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (12 December 2017) | Viewed by 23271

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Environmental Geosciences, University of Vienna, Althanstraße 14 UZAII, 1090 Vienna, Austria
Interests: biochar; inorganic and organic pollutants; sorption of organic contaminants to heterogeneous geosorbents; behavior of PAHs in sediments and soils; environmental relevance of natural and engineered nanoparticles; hydrogeology

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Guest Editor
Department of Environmental Geosciences, University of Vienna, Althanstraße 14 UZAII, 1090 Vienna, Austria
Interests: sorption of organic contaminants to carbonaceous materials; biochar characterization; sorption and degradation of organic pollutants; fate of ionizable organic contaminants; behavior of PAHs in sediments and soils

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Diffusely polluted soils sediments might remain untreated as classical remediation approaches would be disproportionately expensive. The use of biochar, a product of biomass pyrolysis, for the remediation/stabilization of such sites is gaining increasing attention. This is especially due to its relatively low price, and adequate contaminant immobilization potential. Biochar might also have many interesting applications in water treatment. For environmental scientists, biochar application is an especially attractive remediation strategy, because it may simultaneously address additional environmental issues, including climate change mitigation, biomass waste management, soil acidification, and soil desertification. In this Special Issue of Water, entitled “Biochar Based Soil Water Treatment“, we invite novel contributions on the use of biochar for the sustainable green remediation of polluted soil, sediment, and water. Submissions may include both lab scale and field scale studies on the remediation of organic as well as inorganic contaminants. Topics may include, but are not limited to: (i) contaminant immobilization using biochar; (ii) effects of biochar on contaminant transformation; (iii) effects of biochar on contaminant bioavailability; (iv) biochar functionalization using environmentally friendly methods, such as steam activation and post-pyrolysis air oxidation; (v) changes in biochar properties; and (vi) sorption potential following application to soil, sediment, and/or water.

Prof. Dr. Thilo Hofmann
Mr. Gabriel Sigmund
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • biochar
  • carbonaceous sorbents
  • contaminants
  • pollution
  • organic
  • inorganic
  • water treatment
  • sorption
  • remediation
  • soil.

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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9 pages, 363 KiB  
Article
Assessment of the Binding of Protons, Al and Fe to Biochar at Different pH Values and Soluble Metal Concentrations
by Tan Dang, Petra Marschner, Rob Fitzpatrick and Luke M. Mosley
Water 2018, 10(1), 55; https://doi.org/10.3390/w10010055 - 10 Jan 2018
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 4240
Abstract
Biochar can retain large amounts of protons and metals in the drainage water from acid sulfate soils and mine sites. Metal sorption can, however, be influenced by many factors, such as pH and metal composition. This study investigated proton, Al, and Fe retention [...] Read more.
Biochar can retain large amounts of protons and metals in the drainage water from acid sulfate soils and mine sites. Metal sorption can, however, be influenced by many factors, such as pH and metal composition. This study investigated proton, Al, and Fe retention capacity of eucalyptus biochar (1% w/v) at different pH and metal concentrations. In the absence of metals, the biochar had a high proton binding capacity, (up to 0.035 mmol of H+), whereas its capacity to retain hydroxide ions was limited. A batch experiment was carried out at pH 4 and pH 7 with 10−6, 10−5, 10−4, 10−3, and 10−2 M of added Fe or Al. Added metals precipitated considerably prior to addition of the biochar except that Al remained highly soluble at pH 4. The biochar had a high retention capacity for Al and Fe; at high (>1 mM) concentrations, over 80% of soluble metals were retained. Metal competition for binding sites of both Al and Fe at different ratios was investigated, but increasing concentrations of one metal did not reduce retention of the other. The results confirmed that biochar has high metal binding capacity under both acidic and neutral conditions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biochar Based Soil Water Treatment)
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Review

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19 pages, 747 KiB  
Review
Activated Carbon, Biochar and Charcoal: Linkages and Synergies across Pyrogenic Carbon’s ABCs
by Nikolas Hagemann, Kurt Spokas, Hans-Peter Schmidt, Ralf Kägi, Marc Anton Böhler and Thomas D. Bucheli
Water 2018, 10(2), 182; https://doi.org/10.3390/w10020182 - 9 Feb 2018
Cited by 206 | Viewed by 18248
Abstract
Biochar and activated carbon, both carbonaceous pyrogenic materials, are important products for environmental technology and intensively studied for a multitude of purposes. A strict distinction between these materials is not always possible, and also a generally accepted terminology is lacking. However, research on [...] Read more.
Biochar and activated carbon, both carbonaceous pyrogenic materials, are important products for environmental technology and intensively studied for a multitude of purposes. A strict distinction between these materials is not always possible, and also a generally accepted terminology is lacking. However, research on both materials is increasingly overlapping: sorption and remediation are the domain of activated carbon, which nowadays is also addressed by studies on biochar. Thus, awareness of both fields of research and knowledge about the distinction of biochar and activated carbon is necessary for designing novel research on pyrogenic carbonaceous materials. Here, we describe the dividing ranges and common grounds of biochar, activated carbon and other pyrogenic carbonaceous materials such as charcoal based on their history, definition and production technologies. This review also summarizes thermochemical conversions and non-thermal pre- and post-treatments that are used to produce biochar and activated carbon. Our overview shows that biochar research should take advantage of the numerous techniques of activation and modification to tailor biochars for their intended applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biochar Based Soil Water Treatment)
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