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Special Issue "Sustainable Management of River, Reservoir and Lake Ecosystems under a Changing Climate"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Hydrology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2019.

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Sewoong Chung

Environmental Engineering, Chungbuk National University, Republic of Korea
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +81-43-261-3370
Interests: water quality modeling; ecological modelling; algal bloom; turbidity flow; climate change
Guest Editor
Prof. Hiroshi Yajima

Estuary Research Center, Shimane University
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +81-852-32-6067
Guest Editor
Prof. Joon Ha Kim

School of Earth Sciences and Environmental Engineering, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +82-62-715-3277
Guest Editor
Prof. Kyung Hwa Cho

School of Urban and Environmental Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +82-52-217-2829

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Surface waters including rivers, reservoirs and lakes are vital water resources for humans and nature. However, many freshwater systems are altered by global climate change and various anthropogenic disturbances including urbanization, agriculture, the livestock industry, and weir installation. These conditions have been shown to cause the severe impairment of aquatic ecosystems such as an increase in water temperature and thermal stratification, hypoxia, eutrophication and harmful algae blooms, increased sediment and nonpoint source pollutant loads due to heavy precipitation. In addition, many studies showed that reservoirs and lakes are major emitters of greenhouse gases to the atomsphere. The large CO2 emissions in inland waters arise from the fact that organic carbon (OC) precipitates about 50 times faster in inland waters than in oceans and accumulates in sediments, becoming a key factor in CO2 supersaturation.

Thus the sustainable management of these freshwater ecosystems is a worldwide priority under the pressure of global climate change as well as human activities. The sustainable management of these precious water resources is highly dependent on the integrated monitoring and modeling technologies of the system, and integrated knowledge of the relationships between physical and biogeochemical processes.

This Special Issue of Water concentrates on recent studies that present the current state of the art on the challenges related to the sustainable management of river, reservoir and lake ecosystems considering climate change.

Potential topics include but are not limited to the following:

  • Advanced monitoring of aquatic ecosystems including high density data
  • Carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus cycles in rivers, reservoirs, and lakes
  • Coupled modeling of hydrodynamics, water quality, and ecological processes
  • Impact of climate change on the water quality and aquatic ecosystem of rivers, reservoirs, and lakes
  • Impact of extreme events (floods or droughts) on the water quality and aquatic ecosystem of rivers, reservoirs, and lakes
  • Advanced technologies to mitigatge hypoxia and harmful algal blooms for rivers, reservoirs, and lakes

Prof. Sewoong Chung
Prof. Hiroshi Yajima
Prof. Joon Ha Kim
Prof. Kyung Hwa Cho
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Algal bloom
  • Climate change impact on aquatic ecosystem
  • Ecological modeling
  • High density data
  • Impact of extreme events on freshwater ecosystem
  • Sediment and turbidity flow
  • Sustainable management of rivers, reservoirs, and lakes
  • Water quality monitoring and modeling

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Analysis of Environmental Factors Associated with Cyanobacterial Dominance after River Weir Installation
Water 2019, 11(6), 1163; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11061163
Received: 22 April 2019 / Revised: 24 May 2019 / Accepted: 1 June 2019 / Published: 3 June 2019
PDF Full-text (6184 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Following the installation of 16 weirs in South Korea’s major rivers through the Four Rivers Project (2010–2012), the water residence time increased significantly. Accordingly, cyanobacterial blooms have occurred frequently, raising concerns regarding water use and the aquatic ecosystem health. This study analyzed the [...] Read more.
Following the installation of 16 weirs in South Korea’s major rivers through the Four Rivers Project (2010–2012), the water residence time increased significantly. Accordingly, cyanobacterial blooms have occurred frequently, raising concerns regarding water use and the aquatic ecosystem health. This study analyzed the environmental factors associated with cyanobacterial dominance at four weirs on the Nakdong River through field measurements, and parametric and non-parametric data mining methods. The environmental factors related to cyanobacterial dominance were the seven-day cumulative rainfall (APRCP7), seven-day averaged flow (Q7day), water temperature (Temp), stratification strength (ΔT), electrical conductivity (EC), dissolved oxygen (DO), pH, and NO3–N, NH3–N, total nitrogen (TN), total phosphorous (TP), PO4–P, chlorophyll–a, Fe, total organic carbon (TOC), and SiO2 content, along with biological and chemical oxygen demands. The results indicate that site-specific environmental factors contributed to the cyanobacterial dominance for each weir. In general, the physical characteristics of EC, APRCP7, Q7day, Temp, and ΔT were the most important factors influencing cyanobacterial dominance. The EC was strongly associated with cyanobacterial dominance at the weirs because high EC indicated persistent low flow conditions. A minor correlation was obtained between nutrients and cyanobacterial dominance in all but one of the weirs. The results provide valuable information regarding the effective countermeasures against cyanobacterial overgrowth in rivers. Full article
Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle
Variation and Driving Factors of Water Discharge and Sediment Load in Different Regions of the Jinsha River Basin in China in the Past 50 Years
Water 2019, 11(5), 1109; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11051109
Received: 21 April 2019 / Revised: 20 May 2019 / Accepted: 23 May 2019 / Published: 27 May 2019
PDF Full-text (1655 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The Jinsha River is the main source of sediment in the Yangtze River Basin. The variation of water discharge and sediment load not only affects the operation of the cascade reservoirs in the basin but also change the water and sediment conditions into [...] Read more.
The Jinsha River is the main source of sediment in the Yangtze River Basin. The variation of water discharge and sediment load not only affects the operation of the cascade reservoirs in the basin but also change the water and sediment conditions into the Three Gorges Reservoir. The Jinsha River Basin is divided into six regions based on the measured data of hydrological stations. Herein, the variation regularity and driving factors of water discharge and sediment load in the Jinsha River Basin are analyzed in the past 50 years using the Mann–Kendall and Rank Sum Test. Results show that the source of water and sediment in the Jinsha River Basin is different, and the abrupt and trend changes of water discharge and sediment load in different regions are evident different. Changes in precipitation, water and soil conservation projects, and the construction of reservoirs are the main driving factors of sediment load variation. The average annual sediment reduction load in the Jinsha River from 1998 to 2015 is approximately 99.57 × 106 t/y, of which the contributions of water discharge change and human activities to sediment load are 18.9% and 81.1%, respectively. The reduction of sediment load in the Jinsha River Basin can result in evident decrease in the sedimentation of cascade reservoirs, erosion of the downstream channel of the river, and considerable reduction of sediment load into the Three Gorges Reservoir. Full article
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Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Investigating Influence of Hydrological Regime on Organic Matters Characteristic in a Korean Watershed
Water 2019, 11(3), 512; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11030512
Received: 3 February 2019 / Revised: 6 March 2019 / Accepted: 7 March 2019 / Published: 12 March 2019
PDF Full-text (6307 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Source tracking of dissolved organic matter (DOM) is important to manage water quality in rivers. However, it is difficult to find the source of this DOM because various DOMs can be added from the river watershed. Moreover, the DOM composition can be changed [...] Read more.
Source tracking of dissolved organic matter (DOM) is important to manage water quality in rivers. However, it is difficult to find the source of this DOM because various DOMs can be added from the river watershed. Moreover, the DOM composition can be changed due to environmental conditions. This study investigated the change of organic matter characteristics in the Taewha River of Ulsan City, Korea, before and after rainfall. A Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) was used to simulate water flow from various sources, and dissolved organic matter characterization was conducted in terms of molecular size distribution, hydrophobicity, fluorescence excitation and emission, and molecular composition. From the results, it was found that lateral flow transported hydrophobic and large-molecule organic matter after rainfall. According to the orbitrap mass spectrometer analysis, the major molecular compound of the DOM was lignin. Coupling the SWAT model with organic matter characterization was an effective approach to find sources of DOM in river. Full article
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Figure 1

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