Factors Influencing Public Acceptance of Recycled Water

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Water and One Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 25 March 2024 | Viewed by 5542

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Laboratory of Neuromanagement in Engineering, Xi'an University of Architecture and Technology, Xi'an 710055, China
Interests: neural sensors; neuromanagement in engineering; engineering management; public acceptance
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Xiaojun Liu
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Management, Xi’an University of Architecture and Technology, Xi’an 710055, China
Interests: public acceptance of recycled water; environmental management
UniSA Business, University of South Australia, Adelaide, SA 5001, Australia
Interests: urban water governance; sustainable water management; public attitudes and behavior
Justice & Society, University of South Australia, Adelaide, SA5001, Australia
Interests: water policies and laws; urban water governance; water justice

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Public acceptance of recycled water has drawn attention from both policymakers and researchers in recent decades. While the range of potential uses of recycled water have expanded due to advances in treatment technology, public acceptance is the deciding factor for the implementation of recycled water projects anywhere in the world. Social science studies regarding public acceptance for using non-conventional waters, including recycled wastewater, recycled stormwater, and desalinated water, originated in the late last century. However, there is a relative lack of longer-term longitudinal studies documenting factors that influence public acceptance of using recycled water and how these factors can shift over time.

Another important research gap in this area is that such studies were rarely conducted in developing or emerging countries. Thus far, most of the existing research is concentrated in the United States, Israel, Singapore, or Australia, and rarely in developing countries, in which the population is very different in dimensions such as size, values, social and cultural norms, or dwelling types than in developed western countries. The proposed Special Issue aims to address these research gaps and to advocate a successful exchange of experience between developed and developing countries in such areas which are important to global wellbeing and sustainability.

Dr. Hanliang Fu
Prof. Dr. Xiaojun Liu
Dr. Zhifang Wu
Prof. Dr. Jennifer McKay
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • public acceptance
  • public participation
  • willingness to pay
  • yuck factor
  • health risks
  • social and demographic factors
  • public perceptions and attitudes
  • non-conventional waters
  • sustainable water management

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

12 pages, 1144 KiB  
Article
Modeling and Dynamic Simulation of the Public’s Intention to Reuse Recycled Water Based on Eye Movement Data
by , , and
Water 2023, 15(1), 114; https://doi.org/10.3390/w15010114 - 29 Dec 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1630
Abstract
The public’s rejection of recycled water has seriously hindered the promotion of recycled water. Individual intention and decision-making behavior will be affected by group decision-making behavior. To clarify the interaction mechanism of the public’s intention to reuse recycled water from the perspective of [...] Read more.
The public’s rejection of recycled water has seriously hindered the promotion of recycled water. Individual intention and decision-making behavior will be affected by group decision-making behavior. To clarify the interaction mechanism of the public’s intention to reuse recycled water from the perspective of group decision-making, this study used an eye-movement experiment with a recycled water consumption scenario simulation to obtain the influencing factors and data related to purchase decisions and used the ABM (agent-based modeling) method to simulate the interaction effects of the group’s intention to reuse recycled water in a combination of three influencing factor scenarios: sales volume, quality evaluation, and environmental evaluation on the Netlogo platform. The results showed that (1) quality reviews have a significant effect on the intention of the group to reuse recycled water, followed by sales, and environmental reviews have the worst effect; (2) in the two-factor interaction, the intention of the group to reuse recycled water was significantly improved, and the public’s intention to reuse recycled water was highest under the influence of good quality reviews and high sales; and (3) under the combined influence of the three factors of high sales, good quality reviews, and good environmental reviews, the public’s intention to reuse recycled water was the highest, but the effect was slightly different from the influence of two factors: good quality reviews and high sales. This study aimed to provide a scientific basis for the promotion policy of recycled water reuse. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Factors Influencing Public Acceptance of Recycled Water)
Show Figures

Figure 1

15 pages, 414 KiB  
Article
The Gap between Willingness and Behavior: The Use of Recycled Water for Toilet Flushing in Beijing, China
Water 2022, 14(8), 1287; https://doi.org/10.3390/w14081287 - 15 Apr 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1506
Abstract
Promoting the use of recycled water is an effective way to solve the problem of urban water shortage. In order to promote the utilization of recycled water, this study identified the influential factors determining the differences between willingness and behavior to use recycled [...] Read more.
Promoting the use of recycled water is an effective way to solve the problem of urban water shortage. In order to promote the utilization of recycled water, this study identified the influential factors determining the differences between willingness and behavior to use recycled water for toilet flushing. Binary logistic regression models of willingness and behavior were analyzed and the data came from 1195 Beijing residents in communities where recycled water was available for toilet flushing. The results are as follows: First, the proportion of those willing to use recycled water (92%) was significantly higher than those who actually did so (35.2%); thus, higher willingness to use recycled water did not necessarily lead to higher using behavior. Second, different factors influenced willingness and behavior, with the willingness mainly influenced by cognitive and attitudinal factors, and the behavior dependent on external environmental factors such as the convenience of installation and promotion measures. Third, the convenience of the installation of recycled water facilities is the most important factor influencing both willingness and behavior, and inconvenient facilities are the main factor hindering the use of recycled water. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Factors Influencing Public Acceptance of Recycled Water)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

16 pages, 2534 KiB  
Review
Analysis on the Knowledge Evolution Path of Public Acceptance of Reclaimed Water Research
Water 2022, 14(15), 2300; https://doi.org/10.3390/w14152300 - 24 Jul 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1606
Abstract
Reclaimed water is an important component of available water resources, and public acceptance of reclaimed water is a key factor influencing the implementation of reclaimed water reuse projects. For this reason, it has received attention from different scholars in the international community. Based [...] Read more.
Reclaimed water is an important component of available water resources, and public acceptance of reclaimed water is a key factor influencing the implementation of reclaimed water reuse projects. For this reason, it has received attention from different scholars in the international community. Based on the literature data on public acceptance of reclaimed water, this study analyzes the development status of research results and explores the knowledge evolution path with the help of bibliometric methods. Our results show that the field of research on public acceptance of reclaimed water began to grow rapidly after 1990, and identify influential countries, institutions, authors, and journals in the field. In addition, “water quality”, “public health”, and “irrigation” are themes that run throughout the research, and “sustainable development” and “potable reuse” are the emerging research hotspots. As research progresses, the scope of research on reclaimed water reuse and its influencing factors continues to expand, and reclaimed water management policies and standards continue to improve. In the future, in order to improve public acceptance, finding how to improve the public’s risk perception and trust in reclaimed water will become a central research focus. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Factors Influencing Public Acceptance of Recycled Water)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop