Special Issue "Landscapes and Landforms of Terrestrial and Marine Areas"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Hydrology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 September 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Mauro Soldati
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Università degli Studi di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche e Geologiche, Via Campi 103 - 41125 Modena, Italy
Tel. +39 059 205 8454
Interests: geomorphology; geohazards; mapping
Dr. Federica Foglini
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR), Istituto di Scienze Marine (ISMAR), Bologna, Italy
Tel. +39 051 6398872
Interests: benthic habitats; GIS; geodatabase
Dr. Mariacristina Prampolini
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR), Istituto di Scienze Marine (ISMAR), Bologna, Italy
Tel. +39 051 6398936
Interests: geomorphology; benthic habitats; mapping
Prof. Alessandra Savini
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Università di Milano Bicocca, Dipartimento di Scienze dell’Ambiente e della Terra, Milano, Italy
Tel. +39 02 64482070
Interests: geomorphology; marine geology; benthic habitat mapping

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In most cases, the landscapes and landforms of emerged and submerged areas are investigated separately. Only recently, on-shore geomorphological data have been increasingly integrated with submerged dataset for paleo-environmental reconstructions and land management purposes. Near-shore areas, in particular, are jointly analyzed due to the increasing concentration of human activities that have significant negative impacts on landscapes and habitats.

Modern advances in geo-acoustic and optical full-coverage mapping of both seafloor and near-shore areas, supported by groundthruting information, allow us to acquire large amount of remote and direct data, also in combination with onshore data. Hence, the production of detailed and accurate maps of seabed morphology and substrate can deeply foster integrated studies of emerged and submerged landscapes and landforms.

The aim of this Special Issue is to collect contributions that can demonstrate how the integration of emerged and submerged dataset is unquestionably beneficial, in a wider perspective, for geomorphological research. The manuscripts should focus on the description and analysis of terrestrial and marine landscapes and landforms, with special emphasis on coastal environments and recently submerged areas due to sea level rise. Furthermore, comparisons of terrestrial landforms and processes which have analogous underwater and vice versa would be welcome.

In particular, contributions dealing with the following topics are invited:

  • Terrestrial and marine landforms in near-shore areas, coupling terrestrial and marine datasets for geomorphological reconstruction, hazard assessment, benthic habitat mapping, environmental conservation, coastal management, Marine Spatial Planning, etc.

The integrated analysis of submarine and terrestrial landforms provides a fundamental contribution to the reconstruction of Late Quaternary landscapes and for assessing geohazards, especially considering the effects of climate change and sea level rise. Furthermore, the knowledge of both terrestrial and near-shore landforms is the basis for mapping the benthic habitats and monitoring their status with reference to the coastal processes.

  • Landscapes and landforms of recently submerged areas, e.g., during the post-LGM marine transgression and possible comparison with present terrestrial areas.

Most of the present marine areas, down to a depth of ca. 130 m, were emerged during the last glacial cycle and modelled by subaerial processes that shaped the landforms occurring on the seafloor today. These areas also hosted pre-historic and historic human settlements—as demonstrated by archaeological remains, pollens, bones or other remains in the sediments, caves, etc.—that can be discovered and investigated.

  • Analogous landforms in submarine and terrestrial environments.

This includes description and analysis of landforms that are analogous in terms of processes by which they were modelled; or analogous in terms of similar shape, but possibly related to different kind of processes or to the alternation of subaerial and submarine processes due to sea level oscillations.

Prof. Mauro Soldati

Dr. Federica Foglini
Dr. Mariacristina Prampolini
Prof. Alessandra Savini
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Coastal and marine environments
  • Integration of terrestrial and marine datasets
  • Geomorphology
  • Geophysics
  • Geoarchaeology
  • Paleo-environmental reconstructions
  • Climate change and sea level rise
  • Geohazards
  • Geomorphological Mapping
  • Benthic habitats
  • Environmental protection and conservation

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Bridging Terrestrial and Marine Geoheritage: Assessing Geosites in Portofino Natural Park (Italy)
Water 2019, 11(10), 2112; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11102112 - 11 Oct 2019
Abstract
Interest in geoheritage research has grown over the past 25 years and several countries have issued laws to encourage improvement and conservation. Investigations on geosites are prevalently carried out on land environments, although the study of underwater marine environments is also of paramount [...] Read more.
Interest in geoheritage research has grown over the past 25 years and several countries have issued laws to encourage improvement and conservation. Investigations on geosites are prevalently carried out on land environments, although the study of underwater marine environments is also of paramount scientific importance. Nevertheless, due to the constraints of underwater environments, these sites have been little explored, also on account of the higher costs and difficulties of surveying. This research has identified and assessed the terrestrial and marine geosites of the Portofino Natural Park and Protected Marine Area, which are internationally famous owing to both the land scenic features and the quality of the marine ecosystem. The goal was to pinpoint the most suitable sites for tourist improvement and fruition and identify possible connections between the two environments. In all, 28 terrestrial sites and 27 marine sites have been identified and their scientific value as well as their ecological, cultural, and aesthetic importance has been assessed. In addition, accessibility, services, and economic potential of geosites has also been taken into account. Both the updated database of terrestrial and marine geosites in the Portofino protected areas and the assessment procedure adopted can become useful tools for the managers of these sites and provide decision-makers with possible strategies for tourist development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Landscapes and Landforms of Terrestrial and Marine Areas)
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Open AccessArticle
Geodiversity Evaluation and Water Resources in the Sesia Val Grande UNESCO Geopark (Italy)
Water 2019, 11(10), 2102; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11102102 - 09 Oct 2019
Abstract
This paper aims at systemizing knowledge related to geodiversity assessment for water resources and its evaluation. The novel aspect connected to geodiversity of this paper is the analysis of the components of hydrological system, both at the superficial and underground level, in the [...] Read more.
This paper aims at systemizing knowledge related to geodiversity assessment for water resources and its evaluation. The novel aspect connected to geodiversity of this paper is the analysis of the components of hydrological system, both at the superficial and underground level, in the territory of the Sesia Val Grande United Nations educational, scientific, and cultural organization (UNESCO) Global Geopark (Northwest Italy). More specifically, the research establishes a conceptual model and a specific procedure for the evaluation of geodiversity connected to water resources on a regional scale, by means of a qualitative-quantitative geographic information system (GIS) process, renamed here as hydro-geodiversity assessment. For these purposes, a targeted ecosystem approach is applied to consider the assets of the Geopark territory that has been derived from the interaction between water and other components of geodiversity, i.e., the hydro-geosystemic services. The element selection and processing operations led to the identification of areas characterized by greater values of hydrological geodiversity, in which the link between surface and underground hydrodynamics became closer and intense. The single geodiversity factor maps that were obtained from partial data aggregations were added together in map algebra operations, then subjected to weighing to formulate the hydro-geodiversity map of the Sesia Val Grande UNESCO Global Geopark. The results of the present study strengthen the strategic management of geological, geomorphological, and hydrological heritages of the study area by identifying different landscapes and local peculiarities determined by mutual influences between geology and hydrological dynamics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Landscapes and Landforms of Terrestrial and Marine Areas)
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Open AccessArticle
Sensing the Submerged Landscape of Nisida Roman Harbour in the Gulf of Naples from Integrated Measurements on a USV
Water 2018, 10(11), 1686; https://doi.org/10.3390/w10111686 - 19 Nov 2018
Cited by 3
Abstract
This paper shows an interesting case of coastal landscape reconstruction by using innovative marine robotic instrumentation, applied to an archaeological key-site in the Campi Flegrei (Italy), one of the more inhabited areas in the Mediterranean during the Roman period. This active volcanic area [...] Read more.
This paper shows an interesting case of coastal landscape reconstruction by using innovative marine robotic instrumentation, applied to an archaeological key-site in the Campi Flegrei (Italy), one of the more inhabited areas in the Mediterranean during the Roman period. This active volcanic area is world famous for the ancient coastal cities of Baiae, Puteoli, and Misenum, places of military and commercial excellence. The multidisciplinary study of the submerged Roman harbour at Nisida Island was aimed at reconstructing the natural and anthropogenic underwater landscape by elaborating a multiscale dataset. The integrated marine surveys were carried out by an Unmanned Surface Vehicle (USV) foreseeing the simultaneous use of geophysical and photogrammetric sensors according to the modern philosophy of multi-modal mapping. All instrumental measurements were validated by on-site measurements performed by specialised scuba divers. The multiscale analysis of the sensing data allowed a precise reconstruction of the coastal morpho-evolutive trend and the relative sea level variation in the last 2000 years by means of a new type of archaeological sea-level marker here proposed for the first time. Furthermore, it provided a detailed multidimensional documentation of the underwater cultural heritage and a useful tool for evaluating the conservation state of archaeological submerged structures. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Landscapes and Landforms of Terrestrial and Marine Areas)
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