Special Issue "Managed Aquifer Recharge for Water Resilience"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Water Resources Management and Governance".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 November 2019.

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Peter Dillon Website E-Mail
CSIRO Hon Fellow, NCGRT (Adj Chair), WGA Pty Ltd, Co-Chair IAH Commission on MAR
Phone: +61 8 8303 8714
Interests: hydrogeology; water quality protection; risk management; policy
Guest Editor
Dr. Gudrun Massmann Website E-Mail
Carl con Ossietzky Universität Oldenburg, Hydrogeology & Landscape Hydrology, IBU, Fk. V, Gebäude A1, Germany
Phone: +49 441 7984837
Interests: hydrogeology; groundwater; organic trace pollutants; coastal aquifers; ecohydrology
Guest Editor
Dr. Sharon B. Megdal Website E-Mail
University of Arizona, Water Resources Research Center, Tucson, AZ, USA
Fax: +1 520 792-8518
Interests: water management and policy; groundwater; water banking and recharge; water governance and institutions; transboundary water
Guest Editor
Dr. Enrique Fernández Escalante Website E-Mail
Tragsa R&D, WB Consulter, Co-Chair IAH MAR Commission
Phone: +34913226106
Interests: IWRM; hydrogeology; technical solutions on water management

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

MAR is part of the palette of solutions to water shortage, water security, water quality decline, falling water tables, and endangered groundwater dependent ecosystems. It is often the most economic, most benign, most resilient, and most socially acceptable solution, but has not been considered out of lack of awareness, inadequate knowledge of aquifers, immature perception of risk, and incomplete policies for integrated water management, including linking MAR with demand management. MAR can achieve much towards solving the myriad of local water problems that have collectively been termed “the global water crisis” if it is included among the options evaluated locally. This Special Issue strives to make transparent the effectiveness, benefits, constraints, limitations, and applicability of MAR, together with its supporting scientific advances, to a wide variety of situations that have global relevance. This special issue was initiated by the IAH Commission on Managing Aquifer Recharge to capture and extend from selected papers at the 10th International Symposium on Managed Aquifer Recharge (ISMAR10) held in Madrid, Spain 20-24 May 2019. It also gives an opportunity for including additional highly relevant and timely papers submitted to J Water.

Topics include MAR and:

1. Integrated water resources assessment 11. Monitoring
2. Adaptation to climate change 12. Modeling
3. Case studies 13. Ecosystems
4. Mapping 14. Coastal areas
5. Economics 15. Environmental impacts and risks
6. Commerce and energy 16. Water quality and hydrogeochemistry
7. Water reuse 17. Health aspects
8. Sustainable technical solutions 18. Urban rainwater and stormwater
9. Clogging 19. R&D projects
10. Regulations and policies 20. Education and training and social impacts

Dr. Peter Dillon
Dr. Gudrun Massmann
Dr. Sharon B. Megdal
Dr. Enrique Fernandez Escalante
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • groundwater biogeochemical processes
  • groundwater replenishment
  • water quality improvement
  • water security and risk
  • governance and economics

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Managed Aquifer Recharge as a Strategic Storage and Urban Water Management Tool in Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia
Water 2019, 11(9), 1869; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11091869 - 09 Sep 2019
Abstract
Population growth and increased irrigation demand have caused a decline in groundwater levels that limit water supply in the Darwin rural area. Managed Aquifer Recharge (MAR) is a practical solution that can be adopted to augment stressed groundwater systems and subsequently increase the [...] Read more.
Population growth and increased irrigation demand have caused a decline in groundwater levels that limit water supply in the Darwin rural area. Managed Aquifer Recharge (MAR) is a practical solution that can be adopted to augment stressed groundwater systems and subsequently increase the security of water supply. Aquifer storage capacity is considered to be the primary constraint to MAR where unconfined dolostone aquifers rapidly recharge during the tropical, wet season and drain again in the dry season. As a result, there is a general understanding that aquifers of this nature recharge to full capacity each wet season. However, the aquifer storage capacity and the potential for niche opportunities for MAR to alleviate declining groundwater levels has not previously been examined. This paper uses the Darwin rural area’s Proterozoic Koolpinyah Dolostone aquifer and the existing Koolpinyah Groundwater System to evaluate the prospects of MAR using both infiltration and injection techniques. Direct injection wells in an aquifer storage transfer and recovery (ASTR) scheme were favoured in this area, as injection wells occupy a smaller surface footprint than infiltration basins. This assessment suggested MAR during the early to mid-dry season could alleviate the impact of the dry season decline in groundwater levels in the Darwin rural area. The use of a larger aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) system (5,000,000 m3/year) was also assessed as a potentially viable technical solution in the northern part of the aquifer where it is understood to be confined. The ASR scheme could potentially be scaleable to augment the urban water system and provide strategic long-term storage. Consideration must also be given not only to the strategic positioning of the ASR water bank, but also to the hydrogeology of the aquifers in which the systems would be developed. Not all locations or aquifer systems can successfully support a strategic storage ASR system. Scheme-scale feasibility assessment of an ASR water bank is required. The study reported here is an early phase of a series of investigations that would typically be required to demonstrate the viability of any proposal to apply MAR to increase the reliability of conjunctive groundwater and surface water supplies in stressed water resources systems. It focusses on assessing suitable storage areas in a lateritic aquifer. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Managed Aquifer Recharge for Water Resilience)
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Open AccessArticle
Clogging Issues with Aquifer Storage and Recovery of Reclaimed Water in the Brackish Werribee Aquifer, Melbourne, Australia
Water 2019, 11(9), 1807; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11091807 - 30 Aug 2019
Abstract
As part of an integrated water-cycle management strategy, City West Water (CWW) is conducting research to develop an aquifer storage recovery (ASR) scheme utilizing recycled water. In this contribution, we address the risk of well clogging based on two ASR bore pilots, each [...] Read more.
As part of an integrated water-cycle management strategy, City West Water (CWW) is conducting research to develop an aquifer storage recovery (ASR) scheme utilizing recycled water. In this contribution, we address the risk of well clogging based on two ASR bore pilots, each with intensive monitoring. Well clogging is a critical aspect of the strategy due to a projected high injection rate, a high clogging potential of recycled water, and a small diameter injection borehole. Microscopic and geochemical analysis of suspended solids in the injectant and backflushed water, demonstrate a significant contribution of diatoms, algae and colloidal or precipitating Fe(OH)3, Al(OH)3 and MnO2. CWW is, therefore, testing additional prefiltration that includes a 20 μm spin Klin disc and 1–5 μm bag filter operating in series. In this paper, we present optimized methods to (i) detect the contribution of the injectant and aquifer particles to total suspended solids in backflushed water by hydrogeochemical analysis; and (ii) predict and reduce the risk of physical and biological clogging, by combination of the membrane filter index (MFI) method of Buik and Willemsen, a modification of the total suspended solids method of Bichara and an amendment of the exponential bacterial growth method of Huisman and Olsthoorn. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Managed Aquifer Recharge for Water Resilience)
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