Special Issue "Influence of Geothermal Heat Pumps on Groundwater"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Hydrology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Andrew Chiasson
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
University of Dayton, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Dayton, United States
Interests: geothermal; ground source heat pump systems; solar; thermal systems modeling; low-energy buildings

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The effects of groundwater on the thermal performance of geothermal heat pump (GHP) systems has been studied by numerous researchers over the past few decades and is now fairly well understood, but what about the other way around? That is, what are the effects of GHP systems on groundwater? These effects, spanning issues related to groundwater quality, quantity, and resource sustainability, have not been studied in great detail and, therefore, are not well understood. As GHP systems become adopted on larger scales, the thermal effects on the subsurface need to be better quantified.

GHP systems extract and reject heat from/to the subsurface to heat and cool buildings. Relative to traditional heating systems, thermal energy extracted from fossil fuels for building heating comes from the subsurface in GHP systems. Likewise, relative to traditional cooling systems, thermal energy rejected to the atmosphere in building cooling is rejected to the subsurface in GHP systems. Thermal energy extracted from and rejected to the subsurface directly or indirectly impacts groundwater. Therefore, this Special Issue seeks to shed more light on the effects of the changing thermal regime on groundwater as a result of the use of GHP systems by welcoming contributions and articles related to the following: thermal and bacterialogical modeling/monitoring of groundwater in contact with either open- or closed-loop GHP systems; GHP field studies of groundwater thermal and chemical interactions; aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) and groundwater resource sustainability; regulatory and groundwater resource management issues related to open- or closed-loop GHP systems; and permafrost stabilization due to subsurface heat extraction.

Dr. Andrew Chiasson
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Groundwater thermal plume modeling
  • Groundwater thermal plume field monitoring
  • Subsurface thermal–chemical interactions
  • Microorganisms in groundwater
  • Ungerground heat and environmental risk

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Effects of a Groundwater Heat Pump on Thermophilic Bacteria Activity
Water 2019, 11(10), 2084; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11102084 - 06 Oct 2019
Abstract
Groundwater samples were collected from the tubular wells of a groundwater heat pump (GWHP), and the psychrophilic, mesophilic, and thermophilic bacteria inhabiting the collected groundwater were cultured and isolated. Using the isolated bacteria, we analyzed temperature-dependent changes in autochthonous bacteria based on the [...] Read more.
Groundwater samples were collected from the tubular wells of a groundwater heat pump (GWHP), and the psychrophilic, mesophilic, and thermophilic bacteria inhabiting the collected groundwater were cultured and isolated. Using the isolated bacteria, we analyzed temperature-dependent changes in autochthonous bacteria based on the operation of the GWHP. Microbial culture identified eight species of bacteria: five species of thermophilic bacteria (Anoxybacillus tepidamans, Bacillus oceanisediminis, Deinococcus geothermalis, Effusibacillus pohliae, and Vulcaniibacterium thermophilum), one species of mesophilic bacteria (Lysobacter mobilis), and two species of psychrophilic bacteria (Paenibacillus elgii and Paenibacillus lautus). The results indicated A. tepidamans as the most dominant thermophilic bacterium in the study area. Notably, the Anoxybacillus genus was previous reported as a microorganism capable of creating deposits that clog above-ground wells and filters at geothermal power plants. Additionally, we found that on-site operation of the GWHP had a greater influence on the activity of thermophilic bacteria than on psychrophilic bacteria among autochthonous bacteria. These findings suggested that study of cultures of thermophilic bacteria might contribute to understanding the bio-clogging phenomena mediated by A. tepidamans in regard to GWHP-related thermal efficiency. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Influence of Geothermal Heat Pumps on Groundwater)
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