Special Issue "Toxic Effects of Manufactured Nanoparticles and Atmospheric Particulate Matter"

A special issue of Toxics (ISSN 2305-6304). This special issue belongs to the section "Air Pollution and Human Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 29 December 2022 | Viewed by 275

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Yun Wu
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Information Science & Technology (NUIST), Nanjing 210044, China
Interests: nanoparticles; atmospheric particulate matter; heavy metals; ecotoxicity; human health; mixture toxicity
Prof. Dr. Xinlei Ge
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Information Science & Technology (NUIST), Nanjing 210044, China
Interests: air pollution; atmospheric chemistry; atmospheric particulate matter; human health

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Atmospheric particulate matter is a major environmental pollutant threatening human health. The wide application of nanoparticles over the last few decades has raised serious concerns about their potential environmental and health risks. Both atmospheric particulate matter and nanoparticles vary greatly in chemical composition, particle structure, size and property, which complicate their exposure and toxicity. There is a crucial need to further understand, simulate, evaluate and reduce the toxicity of these particles. This Special Issue on “Toxic Effects of Manufactured Nanoparticles and Atmospheric Particulate Matter” will aim at highlighting the latest advances in particle toxicity in a timely manner.  Authors are invited to submit original research papers, reviews, and short communications.

Topics may include, but are not limited to, the following:

  1. Potential exposure pathways and risks of nanoparticles and/or atmospheric particulate matter.
  2. Toxic responses and mechanisms of nanoparticles and/or atmospheric particulate matter.
  3. Novel methods, models or assays for particle toxicity evaluation.
  4. Methods and mechanisms for reducing particle toxicity.
  5. Particle interactions with other contaminants.

Prof. Dr. Yun Wu
Prof. Dr. Xinlei Ge
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Toxics is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • nanoparticles
  • atmospheric particulate matter
  • toxicity
  • health risks
  • exposure
  • risk assessment

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Chemical Characteristics and Source-Specific Health Risks of the Volatile Organic Compounds in Urban Nanjing, China
Toxics 2022, 10(12), 722; https://doi.org/10.3390/toxics10120722 - 24 Nov 2022
Viewed by 147
Abstract
This work comprehensively investigated the constituents, sources, and associated health risks of ambient volatile organic compounds (VOCs) sampled during the autumn of 2020 in urban Nanjing, a megacity in the densely populated Yangtze River Delta region in China. The total VOC (TVOC, sum [...] Read more.
This work comprehensively investigated the constituents, sources, and associated health risks of ambient volatile organic compounds (VOCs) sampled during the autumn of 2020 in urban Nanjing, a megacity in the densely populated Yangtze River Delta region in China. The total VOC (TVOC, sum of 108 species) concentration was determined to be 29.04 ± 14.89 ppb, and it was consisted of alkanes (36.9%), oxygenated VOCs (19.9%), halogens (19.1%), aromatics (9.9%), alkenes (8.9%), alkynes (4.9%), and others (0.4%). The mean TVOC/NOx (ppbC/ppbv) ratio was only 3.32, indicating the ozone control is overall VOC-limited. In terms of the ozone formation potential (OFP), however, the largest contributor became aromatics (41.9%), followed by alkenes (27.6%), and alkanes (16.9%); aromatics were also the dominant species in secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation, indicative of the critical importance of aromatics reduction to the coordinated control of ozone and fine particulate matter (PM2.5). Mass ratios of ethylbenzene/xylene (E/X), isopentane/n-−pentane (I/N), and toluene/benzene (T/B) ratios all pointed to the significant influence of traffic on VOCs. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) revealed five sources showing that traffic was the largest contributor (29.2%), particularly in the morning. A biogenic source, however, became the most important source in the afternoon (31.3%). The calculated noncarcinogenic risk (NCR) and lifetime carcinogenic risk (LCR) of the VOCs were low, but four species, acrolein, benzene, 1,2-dichloroethane, and 1,2-dibromoethane, were found to possess risks exceeding the thresholds. Furthermore, we conducted a multilinear regression to apportion the health risks to the PMF-resolved sources. Results show that the biogenic source instead of traffic became the most prominent contributor to the TVOC NCR and its contribution in the afternoon even outpaced the sum of all other sources. In summary, our analysis reveals the priority of controls of aromatics and traffic/industrial emissions to the efficient coreduction of O3 and PM2.5; our analysis also underscores that biogenic emissions should be paid special attention if considering the direct health risks of VOCs. Full article
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