Special Issue "Transitions to Sustainable Urban Mobility in Global South Cities: Challenges, Innovations and Opportunities"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Transportation".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Daniel Oviedo Hernandez
Website
Guest Editor
University College London
Interests: the social consequences of urban transport and development in global south cities, particularly in relation with accessibility, equity, wellbeing and social exclusion
Mr. Sebastian Castellanos
Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
World Resources Institute and the University of Leeds
Interests: the intersection of new transport technologies, mitigation of GHG and policy

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue intends to bring together new and emerging interdisciplinary research that explores current trajectories, practices and drivers of sustainable and inclusive transport and land use development in growing cities in Latin America and the Caribbean, Africa and South-East Asia. In a context of rapid urbanisation and economic growth, increasing access to new technologies, and shifts in paradigms of individual and collective mobility, new challenges and opportunities are emerging for global south cities in relation to how to plan, govern and regulate urban transport systems. Such challenges represent a new area of research on sustainable mobility, requiring new conceptual and methodological developments, as well as yielding new empirical evidence of new travel behaviours, perceptions and priorities of increasingly connected citizens and the potential social consequences of inequalities in terms of access to new transport alternatives and technologies. This Special Issue invites contributions from all disciplines related to sustainable mobility exploring aspects of governance, regulation, travel behaviour and distributional effects of new forms of urban mobility in global south cities, as well as challenges and opportunities for more sustainable development. Topics might include but are not limited to the intersection between sustainable urban mobility in global south cities and micromobility, MAAS, informal transport and technology, innovations in integration between collective and mass transit, governance and regulation of disruptions, shared mobility, smart cities, accessibility and social inclusion effects of disruptions.

This special issue is aligned with efforts by the Transitions to Sustainable Urban Mobility (T-SUM) project and the New Urban Mobility (NUMO) Alliance. More information available at: https://www.t-sum.org  and https://www.numo.global.

Dr. Daniel Oviedo Hernandez
Mr. Sebastian Castellanos
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Sustainable mobility
  • Global south
  • Urban transport
  • Urban development
  • Disruptions
  • Micromobility
  • MAAS
  • Governance
  • Equity
  • Technology

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
The Relationship between Regular Use of Ridesourcing and Frequency of Public Transport Use in the MENA Region (Tehran and Cairo)
Sustainability 2020, 12(19), 8134; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12198134 - 02 Oct 2020
Abstract
Despite the growing share of ridesourcing services in cities, there is limited research about their impacts on other transport mode choices in the large cities of the Middle East and North Africa (MENA). There is a debate about whether ridesourcing affects the frequent [...] Read more.
Despite the growing share of ridesourcing services in cities, there is limited research about their impacts on other transport mode choices in the large cities of the Middle East and North Africa (MENA). There is a debate about whether ridesourcing affects the frequent use of sustainable modes like public transport. This study uses the results of a large-scale series of face-to-face interviews in Tehran and Cairo to study the relationship between the regular use of ridesourcing and the frequency of public transport use. Descriptive statistics and logit regression are used to analyze this association. The findings indicate contradictory correlations between the regular use of ridesourcing and the frequent use of public transport in Tehran and Cairo. The regular use of ridesourcing has a positive correlation with the probability of frequent public transport use in Cairo. In contrast, this correlation is negative in Tehran, which means that the regular ridesourcing users are less likely than the non-regular users to use frequently public transport. The reasons for these different correlations are studied in terms of socioeconomic variables, accessibility, and the citizens’ perception of public transport in both cities. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Optimizing Land Use Allocation of Transit-Oriented Development (TOD) to Generate Maximum Ridership
Sustainability 2020, 12(9), 3798; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12093798 - 07 May 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Transit-oriented development (TOD) is based around transit stations, with the emphasis on high population density and multifunctional areas in promoting sustainable mobility. This study aimed to develop a TOD model that could achieve an optimum land use allocation to maximize transit ridership. A [...] Read more.
Transit-oriented development (TOD) is based around transit stations, with the emphasis on high population density and multifunctional areas in promoting sustainable mobility. This study aimed to develop a TOD model that could achieve an optimum land use allocation to maximize transit ridership. A critical literature review, an analysis of value engineering through function and benchmarking studies were conducted in order to develop a baseline plan for a TOD model, which was then optimized using linear programming. A total of four light rail transit (LRT) stations located in Jakarta were used as the case study to represent model implementation, ridership evaluation and optimal design. The optimization results showed that office workers constituted the highest number of transit passengers, followed by those working in hotels and commercial/retail and residential users. It was also found that optimizing the design of the TOD can increase the number of daily LRT passengers by up to 55%. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Ridesourcing and Travel Demand: Potential Effects of Transportation Network Companies in Bogotá
Sustainability 2020, 12(5), 1732; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12051732 - 26 Feb 2020
Abstract
This paper proposes a modal-shift analysis methodology based on a mix of small-scale primary data and big data sources to estimate the total amount of trips that are reallocated to transportation network companies (TNCs) services in Bogotá, Colombia. The analysis is focused on [...] Read more.
This paper proposes a modal-shift analysis methodology based on a mix of small-scale primary data and big data sources to estimate the total amount of trips that are reallocated to transportation network companies (TNCs) services in Bogotá, Colombia. The analysis is focused on the following four modes: public transportation, private vehicles, conventional taxis, and TNC services. Based on a stated preferences survey and secondary databases of travel times and costs, the paper proposes a methodology to estimate the reallocation of travel demand once TNCs start operating. Results suggests that approximately one third of public transportation trips are potentially transferred to TNCs. Moreover, potential taxi and private vehicle–transferred trips account for almost 30% of the new TNC demand. Additionally, approximately half of the trips that are reallocated from public transport demand can be considered as complementary, while the remaining share can be considered as potential replacing trips of public transportation. The paper also estimates the potential increase in Vehicle-km travelled in each of the modes before and after substitution as a proxy to the effects of demand reallocation on sustainability, finding increases between 1.3 and 14.5 times the number of Vehicle-km depending on the mode. The paper highlights the role of open data and critical perspectives on available information to analyze potential scenarios of the introduction of disruptive technologies and their spatial, social, and economic implications. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop