Special Issue "Recent Development in Non-thermal Food Processing"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Chemical Engineering and Technology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Kei Eguchi
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Information Electronics, Fukuoka Institute of Technology, Fukuoka, Japan
Interests: power converters; circuits and systems; non-thermal food processing systems
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

For the past few decades, non-thermal food processing is receiving much attention, because nutritious and fresh processed foods can be provided. Furthermore, in recent years, the techniques are extensively investigated concerning nutritive food quality, microbiological safety, drying, extraction, and enzyme inactivation including novel non-thermal processing techniques. In the area of non-thermal food processing, this special issue covers various topics such as pulsed electric field, ultrasonication, ionizing radiation, high hydrostatic pressure, plasma sterilization, pulse light, microfiltration, ultraviolet light, magnetic field heating and moderate field heating, high-voltage electrical discharge and gliding arc discharge, etc. The state-of-the-art developments of non-thermal processing on foods, such as vegetables, fruits, meat, fish, cereal products, etc., is discussed in this special issue. Unlike existing literatures, the purpose of this special issue is to collect articles that describe the state-of-the-art in mentioned area and to attract researchers dealing with unresearched topics. Food scientists, food engineers, food product developers and food industry personnel will be able to find a lot of valuable information from this special issue.

Prof. Dr. Kei Eguchi
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Non-thermal technologies
  • Food industry
  • Pulsed electric field
  • Ultrasonication
  • Ionizing radiation
  • High hydrostatic pressure
  • Plasma sterilization
  • Pulse light
  • Microfiltration
  • Ultraviolet light
  • Magnetic field heating and moderate field heating
  • High-voltage electrical discharge and gliding arc discharge

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Modification of Cockcroft–Walton-Based High-Voltage Multipliers with 220 V and 50 Hz Input for Non-Thermal Food Processing Apparatus
Sustainability 2020, 12(16), 6330; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12166330 - 06 Aug 2020
Abstract
A design of high-voltage multipliers to generate underwater shockwaves is one of the most important factors for successfully providing non-thermal food processing in a cost-effective manner. To be capable of fully utilizing the Cockcroft–Walton-based high-voltage multipliers for underwater shockwave generation, this paper presents [...] Read more.
A design of high-voltage multipliers to generate underwater shockwaves is one of the most important factors for successfully providing non-thermal food processing in a cost-effective manner. To be capable of fully utilizing the Cockcroft–Walton-based high-voltage multipliers for underwater shockwave generation, this paper presents a topological modification of three interesting design approaches in bipolar structure for 220 V and 50 Hz AC input to generate more than 3.5 kV DC output within short time periods. In addition to Cockcroft–Walton multipliers (CWMs), the first modified scheme employs a positive full-wave rectifier (FWR) and positive voltage multiplier block (VMB), the second modified scheme employs positive/negative half-wave rectifiers (HWRs), and the last modified scheme employs a switched-capacitor AC-AC converter. To comparatively analyze their performances, the digitally controlled operations of the modified realization schemes as well as their electrical characteristic estimation based on a four-terminal equivalent model are described in detail. The effectiveness of three modified circuit configurations and the correctness of the given theoretical analysis are verified through SPICE (Simulation Program with Integrated Circuit Emphasis) simulation results. The formulas achieved from theoretical estimation are particularly useful when designing the proposed high-voltage multipliers (HVMs) because good agreement between the theoretical and simulation results can be achieved. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Development in Non-thermal Food Processing)
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Open AccessArticle
Reduction of Inrush Current in a Shockwave Non-Thermal Food Processing System Using an Exponential Clock Pulse Generator
Sustainability 2020, 12(15), 6095; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12156095 - 29 Jul 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Recently, shockwave food processing is drawing much attention as a low-cost non-thermal food process technique. In shockwave non-thermal food processing, underwater shockwaves are generated by a high voltage generator. Therefore, high inrush currents and high voltage stress on circuit components significantly reduce the [...] Read more.
Recently, shockwave food processing is drawing much attention as a low-cost non-thermal food process technique. In shockwave non-thermal food processing, underwater shockwaves are generated by a high voltage generator. Therefore, high inrush currents and high voltage stress on circuit components significantly reduce the reliability and life expectancy of the circuit. However, to the best of our knowledge, stress reduction techniques and their experimental verification have not been studied yet in the shockwave non-thermal food processing system. In this paper, we propose a stress reduction technique for the shockwave non-thermal food processing system and investigate the effectiveness of the proposed technique experimentally. To achieve high reliability and life expectancy, a new high voltage multiplier with an exponential clock pulse generator is proposed for the shockwave non-thermal food processing system. By slowing down the rate at which the capacitors charge in the high voltage multiplier, the exponential clock pulse generator significantly reduces the inrush current. Furthermore, to perform shockwave non-thermal food processing continuously at a lower voltage level, we present a new electrode with a reset mechanism for wire electric discharge (WED), where a square-shaped metal wire swings on a hinge in the proposed electrode. The proposed electrode enables not only shockwave generation at a lower voltage level but also continuous non-thermal food processing, because the square-shaped metal wire is not melted in the WED process. To confirm the validity of the proposed techniques, some experiments are performed regarding the laboratory prototype of the shockwave non-thermal food processing system. In the performed experiments, reduction of inrush currents and effective food processing are confirmed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Development in Non-thermal Food Processing)
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