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Special Issue "High Mobility Dealing with High Mobility and Related Rhythms"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Transportation".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2021) | Viewed by 6879

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Vincent Kaufmann
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland
Interests: mobility research; land use planning; social theory
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Guillaume Drevon
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Laboratory of Urban Sociology, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland
Interests: mobility; urban times; rhythms; cross-border mobility

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

For several years high mobility has been growing in Europe, dependent upon transport accessibility and ICTS development (Schneider and Collet 2010; Viry, Ravalet, and Kaufmann 2015). High mobility takes different forms and is motivated by several purposes. Labor market access and career achievement constitute the mains purposes, which generates two main forms of high mobility. High commuters are characterized by daily longe distance commuting. Bi- or multiresidentiality refers to people who live in one city and work in another. As suggest surveys on this phenomenon, the high mobility practices depend on one’s life course. Depending on their employment and career achievement needs all along their life course, people will practice high mobility. Family events such as the birth of a child, marriage or separation influence the practice of high mobility, depending on family negotiation and social constraints (Viry and Vincent-Geslin 2015). These configurations of high mobility generate stress on individuals, trouble in family–work balance, and gendered inequalities (Viry, Vincent-Geslin, and Kaufmann 2015). High mobility generates a specific type of life rhythm which is characterized by significant time spent in transport and a desynchronization between the highly mobile individual and their family, partner, and more broadly, the members of their social network. High mobility requires high abilities in social time management and negotiation. Facing high mobility and rhythms, individuals and their families develop strategies basing on several kinds of resources (Drevon 2019). These strategies allow individuals to adapt to the rhythm imposed by the situation of high mobility. From this perspective, this Special Issue aims to understand the limits of high mobility acceptability, necessary resources, and strategies. In this Special Issue, we are looking to publish papers that critically investigate the high mobility, effects on life rhythms, well-being, and gendered inequalities from a range of theoretical, methodological, and disciplinary perspectives.

Papers will focus on the following topics:

  • How does high mobility affect family life and social networks?
  • What strategies and resources are there for facing high mobility?
  • What are the inequalities generated by high mobility?
  • How do highly mobile individuals manage their social time?

Prof. Dr. Vincent Kaufmann
Dr. Guillaume Drevon
Guest Editors

References:

  1. Drevon, Guillaume. 2019. Proposition pour une rythmologie de la mobilité et des sociétés contemporaines. Espaces, mobilités et sociétés. Neuchâtel: Alphil - Presses universitaires suisses.
  2. Schneider, Norbert F., et Beate Collet. 2010. Mobile Living Across Europe II: Causes and Consequences of Job-Related Spatial Mobility in Cross-National Comparison. Verlag Barbara Budrich.
  3. Viry, Gil, Emmanuel Ravalet, et Vincent Kaufmann. 2015. « High Mobility in Europe: An Overview ». In High Mobility in Europe, 29‑58. Palgrave Macmillan, London. https://doi.org/10.1057/9781137447388_3.
  4. Viry, Gil, et Stéphanie Vincent-Geslin. 2015. « High Mobility Over the Life Course ». In High Mobility in Europe: Work and Personal Life, édité par Gil Viry et Vincent Kaufmann, 83‑100. London: Palgrave Macmillan UK. https://doi.org/10.1057/9781137447388_5.
  5. Viry, Gil, Stéphanie Vincent-Geslin, et Vincent Kaufmann. 2015. « Family Development and High Mobility: Gender Inequality ». In High Mobility in Europe: Work and Personal Life, édité par Gil Viry et Vincent Kaufmann, 153‑79. London: Palgrave Macmillan UK. https://doi.org/10.1057/9781137447388_8.

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • High mobility
  • time pressure
  • well-being
  • family work balance
  • abilities
  • gender

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Article
Assessment of the Bus Transit Network: A Perspective from the Daily Activity-Travel Organization of Travelers
Sustainability 2022, 14(4), 2406; https://doi.org/10.3390/su14042406 - 19 Feb 2022
Viewed by 446
Abstract
In a context where daily car use is a spontaneous and habitual choice for a wide majority of the population, the quality of the alternatives to individual motorized vehicles is a major factor in encouraging modal shift. The ease of access to public [...] Read more.
In a context where daily car use is a spontaneous and habitual choice for a wide majority of the population, the quality of the alternatives to individual motorized vehicles is a major factor in encouraging modal shift. The ease of access to public transport can influence the mode choice decision process. However, the diversity of activity-travel patterns questions the definition of a unique and homogeneous accessibility and level-of-service to all travelers. The aim of this paper is to identify, with the help of standard data (micro-census and open data), for whom, when and where the transit supply is adequate or not. The approach is based on a twofold methodology. First, we aim to identify differentiated typical activity-travel patterns among the population. Second, to decompose them in transit supply in time and space. Combined, these two elements synthesize a spatially- and temporally-based demand-supply gap index. The results show for which territories, time slots and population groups the supply is defective or excessive with respect to the demand. Generally speaking, the supply is particularly well dimensioned for the dominant groups, such as commuters, including long-distance travelers, who are mainly men. The imbalances in supply over time and space reveal a differentiated accessibility but also significant socio-spatial inequalities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue High Mobility Dealing with High Mobility and Related Rhythms)
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Article
Links between Attitudes, Mode Choice, and Travel Satisfaction: A Cross-Border Long-Commute Case Study
Sustainability 2020, 12(21), 9203; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12219203 - 05 Nov 2020
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 1247
Abstract
This paper focuses on a particular form of high mobility, namely the long journeys to work generated by cross-border job market. More precisely, it studies the impact of such behaviors on well-being by analyzing the relationships between mode choice, transport-related attitudes, socio-demographic and [...] Read more.
This paper focuses on a particular form of high mobility, namely the long journeys to work generated by cross-border job market. More precisely, it studies the impact of such behaviors on well-being by analyzing the relationships between mode choice, transport-related attitudes, socio-demographic and spatial attributes, and the level of satisfaction in the context of cross-border long commutes to Luxembourg. The statistical modelling is rooted to a conceptual framework that emphasizes the mutual dependencies between attitudes, mode choice, and satisfaction. Based on a survey among long-distance commuters (N = 3093) held in 2010 and 2011, two ordered logistic regressions, one of which including latent constructs of transport-related attitudes derived from a structural equation modelling, are developed to explain satisfaction in commuting. Main findings are: (1) Travel-related attitudes influence satisfaction with travel more than socio-demographic attributes; (2) public transport users are globally more satisfied in commuting than car drivers; (3) the socio-economic model of satisfaction is plagued by omitted variables issues; (4) the attitude model of satisfaction drops all but one socio-economic attributes (education remains) while improving adjustment (Pseudo-R-squared = 0.57 versus 0.09; BIC = 2953 versus 6059) and avoiding omitted variables bias. The effect of attitudes and other latent constructs is of paramount importance, even concealing most socio-demographic attributes to assess satisfaction. The conclusion is devoted to a discussion on the sustainability of these cross-border long commutes from the individual, social, and environmental points of view. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue High Mobility Dealing with High Mobility and Related Rhythms)
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Article
Dealing with Daily Rhythms: Families’ Strategies to Tackle Chronic Time Pressure
Sustainability 2020, 12(17), 7193; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12177193 - 03 Sep 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1169
Abstract
As suggested by the conservation of resources theory, in contemporary societies time is considered as a limited resource in the same way as money and energy. In the current paper, a novel daily rhythm approach related to motility is presented, in order to [...] Read more.
As suggested by the conservation of resources theory, in contemporary societies time is considered as a limited resource in the same way as money and energy. In the current paper, a novel daily rhythm approach related to motility is presented, in order to highlight the effects of life acceleration on family life management and other professional, leisure, and consumption activities. The analysis is based on a qualitative survey involving 20 families (40 interviewees) that include long-distance commuters living in the suburban areas of Voiron and Thionville in France. These families are composed of an active couple and at least two children under 18 years of age, and the couple commutes at least 60 km every day between home and work. Based on this particularly stressful daily configuration, the qualitative survey deals with the modalities of managing daily time between and within these couples. The quantitative and qualitative analysis of the corpus of interviews shows first, a very high daily rhythm, and second, the diversity of strategies that lead to a typology of resources used to deal with daily time pressures. The results suggest that forms of time-related vulnerabilities depend on social, economic, and temporal resources, while confirming the importance of rhythms analysis in the daily mobility field and in the resource theory. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue High Mobility Dealing with High Mobility and Related Rhythms)
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Article
Commuting and the Motherhood Wage Gap: Evidence from Germany
Sustainability 2020, 12(14), 5692; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12145692 - 15 Jul 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1682
Abstract
In the present study, we analyze how childbirth-related changes in commuting contribute to the motherhood wage gap, which in turn accounts for a large part of the gender pay gap. Derived from human capital theory and job search theory, we examine various mechanisms [...] Read more.
In the present study, we analyze how childbirth-related changes in commuting contribute to the motherhood wage gap, which in turn accounts for a large part of the gender pay gap. Derived from human capital theory and job search theory, we examine various mechanisms that might explain why reduced commuting distances after childbirth come along with wage reductions for mothers. The empirical analyses are based on data from the German Socio-Economic Panel (GSOEP) 2001–2017, which are analyzed within a fixed effects (FE) panel framework (n = 41,111 observations from 7183 persons). Firstly, the results show that the transition to first parenthood is associated with a 33% decrease in the commuting distance of women, while the transition to fatherhood has no effect. Secondly, mothers who substantially reduce their commuting distance after the transition to parenthood (who amount to 30% of all mothers in our sample) show an increased wage penalty (−18.4%), compared to mothers who do not reduce their commuting distance (−8.7%). Accordingly, 23% of the motherhood wage penalty can be attributed to wage losses related to the reduction in commuting distance. Thirdly, wage penalties for mothers who change to a job closer to their place of residence can be partly explained by the loss of firm-specific human capital. In addition, the wage penalty for commuting is a consequence of women taking jobs that are less suited to their skills profile and moving to smaller companies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue High Mobility Dealing with High Mobility and Related Rhythms)
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Article
The Ideal of Highly Mobile Prisoners. Re-Legitimating Prison through a New Paradox
Sustainability 2020, 12(9), 3938; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12093938 - 11 May 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1713
Abstract
In our paper, we develop the hypothesis of a general call for high mobility and discuss the consequences of it regarding the legitimation of prison. First, we present the method we used for an analysis of the parliamentary documents of the Belgian penitentiary [...] Read more.
In our paper, we develop the hypothesis of a general call for high mobility and discuss the consequences of it regarding the legitimation of prison. First, we present the method we used for an analysis of the parliamentary documents of the Belgian penitentiary law. We then examine the contemporary social representations of mobility, looking for a definition of what is seen as being properly mobile, and show how intertwined social representations of space and time result in the prevalent vision of an inevitable and constant mobility. Next, we will thus discuss the importance of seeing mobility as much more than its material facet. Our following step will be to propose a formalization of the contemporary requisite for mobility. Through four imperatives (activity, activation, participation, adaptation), the mobilitarian ideal requires each person and organization to be constantly active, mobile, flexible, networking, etc. We argue that, today, we are all meant to be highly mobile. We will apply this theoretical framework to the legitimation of prison in the parliamentary documents of the 2005 Belgian Prison Act in which prison is open and porous, good inmates are described as dynamic individuals on the move, and the legitimate penitentiary system is a paradoxical mobilization system. We will conclude by discussing the need to reshape our vision of the prison, considering its apparently paradoxical relation with mobility. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue High Mobility Dealing with High Mobility and Related Rhythms)
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