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Sustainable Management of Heavy Metals Ⅱ

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 December 2022) | Viewed by 6744

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Agrochemistry and Environment, University Miguel Hernández of Elche, 03202 Elche, Spain
Interests: soil-water-plant system; waste management and recycling
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Guest Editor
Laboratory of Chemical Engineering and Engineering Sustainability, Faculty of Pure and Applied Sciences, Open University of Cyprus, Giannou Kranidioti 89, Latsia, Nicosia 2231, Cyprus
Interests: strategic planning development; circular economy; zero-waste approach; waste prevention; circular and bio-economy and industrial symbiosis; management and treatment of solid waste; end of waste criteria; hazardous waste; environmental impact and environmental risk assessment analysis; life cycle assessment; sustainable development goals
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Guest Editor
Department of Agrochemistry and Environment, University Miguel Hernandez of Elche, Av. de la Universidad s/n, 03206, Elche, Alicante, Spain
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Heavy metals, in general trace elements, are one of the major environmental problems. At present, the increasing environmental and global public health concern related to environmental contamination by heavy metals is well known. Moreover, human exposure has risen dramatically because of an exponential increase in their use in several activities, such as in agricultural, industrial, technological, and urban applications. They are present in soils, water, and atmosphere, and they are a serious risk for the food chain.

The United Nations through the FAO and the European Union are concerned about the problem of heavy metal contamination and its impact on the food chain. Heavy metals soil and water pollution are important challenges in food security.

The main sources from which heavy metals are produced include industrial, geogenic, agricultural, mining, wastewaters, domestic effluents, pharmaceutical, and atmospheric causes. Heavy metal bioavailability is influenced by physical, chemical, and biological factors. Temperature, adsorption, and sequestration are considered as physical, while complexation kinetics, leachability and mobility, lipid solubility, and octanol/water partition coefficients are related with chemical factors. Biological factors such as species characteristics, trophic interactions, and biochemical/physiological adaptation also play important roles.

Heavy metals are also related with health, as they enter our bodies through the food chain. In addition, the illegal disposal of waste such as sewage sludge or household waste affected with heavy metals may affect soils and ground waters, which may enter the human body through the food chain, the breath, or through the skin.

The studies of this Special Issue are expected to address:

  • The source and distribution of heavy metals in the environment (soil, water, air, living organisms, waste).
  • The mapping of areas at a global and regional scale where pollution is a high risk.
  • The consequences of heavy metals on the environment and food security.
  • The relation of trace elements with zero waste strategy and circular economy.
  • Sustainable strategies for the remediation of heavy metal pollution.
  • The impact of metals in environmental policy.
  • Methods to remove and or uptake heavy metals.

Prof. Dr. Jose Navarro Pedreño
Prof. Antonis A. Zorpas
Prof. I. Gómez Lucas
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • distribution
  • environmental health
  • food security
  • metal extractions
  • metals leachability
  • pollution
  • remediation
  • strategies in metal science

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

20 pages, 6684 KiB  
Article
Spatiotemporal Variability Assessment of Trace Metals Based on Subsurface Water Quality Impact Integrated with Artificial Intelligence-Based Modeling
by Bassam Tawabini, Mohamed A. Yassin, Mohammed Benaafi, John Adedapo Adetoro, Abdulaziz Al-Shaibani and S. I. Abba
Sustainability 2022, 14(4), 2192; https://doi.org/10.3390/su14042192 - 15 Feb 2022
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 1446
Abstract
Increasing anthropogenic emissions due to rapid industrialization have triggered environmental pollution and pose a threat to the well-being of the ecosystem. In this study, the first scenario involved the spatio-temporal assessment of topsoil contamination with trace metals in the Dammam region, and samples [...] Read more.
Increasing anthropogenic emissions due to rapid industrialization have triggered environmental pollution and pose a threat to the well-being of the ecosystem. In this study, the first scenario involved the spatio-temporal assessment of topsoil contamination with trace metals in the Dammam region, and samples were taken from 2 zones: the industrial (ID), and the agricultural (AG) area. For this purpose, more than 130 spatially distributed samples of topsoil were collected from residential, industrial, and agricultural areas. Inductively coupled plasma—optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES)—was used to analyze the samples for various trace metals. The second scenario involved the creation of different artificial intelligence (AI) models, namely an artificial neural network (ANN) and a support vector regression (SVR), for the estimation of zinc (Zn), copper (Cu), chromium (Cr), and lead (Pb) using feature-based input selection. The experimental outcomes depicted that the average concentration levels of HMs were as follows: Chromium (Cr) (31.79 ± 37.9 mg/kg), Copper (Cu) (6.76 ± 12.54 mg/kg), Lead (Pb) (6.34 ± 14.55 mg/kg), and Zinc (Zn) (23.44 ± 84.43 mg/kg). The modelling accuracy, based on different evaluation criteria, showed that agricultural and industrial stations showed performance merit with goodness-of-fit ranges of 51–91% and 80–99%, respectively. This study concludes that AI models could be successfully applied for the rapid estimation of soil trace metals and related decision-making. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Management of Heavy Metals Ⅱ)
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12 pages, 1414 KiB  
Article
Investigations of Metal Pollution in Road Dust of Steel Industrial Area and Application of Magnetic Separation
by Hyeryeong Jeong and Kongtae Ra
Sustainability 2022, 14(2), 919; https://doi.org/10.3390/su14020919 - 14 Jan 2022
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1813
Abstract
Pollution characteristics and ecological risks for metals in non-magnetic and magnetic road dust from steel industrial areas were investigated by applying a magnetic separation method. Metal (except for Al, Li, Ti, As, and Sb) concentrations in the magnetic road dust were 1.2 (Sn) [...] Read more.
Pollution characteristics and ecological risks for metals in non-magnetic and magnetic road dust from steel industrial areas were investigated by applying a magnetic separation method. Metal (except for Al, Li, Ti, As, and Sb) concentrations in the magnetic road dust were 1.2 (Sn) to 7.8 (Fe) times higher than those in the non-magnetic road dust. For the magnetic road dust, the geo-accumulation index revealed a strongly to extremely polluted status for Cr, Zn, Cd, and Sb, a strongly polluted status for Mn, Cu, and Pb, and a moderately to strongly polluted status for Fe, Ni, Mo, and Hg. This result indicates that the dominant metal pollution sources of road dust in industrial areas were the traffic activities of heavy-duty vehicles. The mean content of magnetic particles accounted for 44.7% of the total road dust. The metal loadings in the magnetic road dust were 86% (Fe), 77% (Cr), 67% (Mn), 86% (Ni), 76% (Cu), 72% (Zn), 64% (Mo), and 62% (Cd), respectively. Removal of the magnetic fraction from road dust using magnetic separation techniques not only reduces metal contamination but can also improve effective road cleaning strategies or reduce waste generation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Management of Heavy Metals Ⅱ)
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26 pages, 1881 KiB  
Article
Implications of the Phytoremediation of Heavy Metal Contamination of Soils and Wild Plants in the Industrial Area of Haina, Dominican Republic
by Agripina Ramírez, Gregorio García, Olaf Werner, José Navarro-Pedreño and Rosa M. Ros
Sustainability 2021, 13(3), 1403; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13031403 - 29 Jan 2021
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2628
Abstract
The study evaluates pollution by Pb, Zn, and Cr, and a possible sustainable solution through phytoremediation technologies, in the surroundings of Haina, a very polluted area of the Dominican Republic. Soils and plants were analyzed at 11 sampling points. After sample processing, the [...] Read more.
The study evaluates pollution by Pb, Zn, and Cr, and a possible sustainable solution through phytoremediation technologies, in the surroundings of Haina, a very polluted area of the Dominican Republic. Soils and plants were analyzed at 11 sampling points. After sample processing, the elemental composition was analyzed by ICP-OES. Soil metal concentrations, contaminating factors, pollution load indexes, and the Nemerow pollution index were assessed. Soil metal concentrations showed Pb > Zn > Cr, resulting in very strong Pb pollution and medium-impact Zn pollution, with an anthropogenic origin in some sites. This means that some agricultural and residential restrictions must be applied. Accumulation levels in plant tissues, bioaccumulation factors in roots and shoots, and translocation factors were determined for Acalypha alopecuroidea, Achyranthes aspera, Amaranthus dubius, Bidenspilosa, Heliotropium angiospermum, Parthenium hysterophorus, and Sida rhombifolia. The vast majority of the plants showed very low levels of the potentially toxic elements studied, although it may be advisable to take precautions before consumption as they are all considered edible, fodder, and/or medicinal plants. Despite their low rate of bioaccumulation, most of the plants studied could be suitable for the application of phytoremediation of Zn in the field, although further studies are needed to assess their potential for this. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Management of Heavy Metals Ⅱ)
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