Special Issue "Climate Change and Sustainable Development in the Global South"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 25 October 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Godwell Nhamo
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute for Corporate Citizenship, University of South Africa, Pretoria 0002, South Africa
Interests: climate change; sustainable development; disaster risk reduction and management
Dr. Kaitano Dube
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Ecotourism Management, Vaal University of Technology, Vanderbijlpark 1911, South Africa
Interests: tourism geography; climate change; sustainable development
Dr. David Chikodzi
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Institute for Corporate Citizenship, University of South Africa, Pretoria 0002, South Africa
Interests: climate change; livelihoods; sustainable development; water resources management; earth observation
Dr. Lazarus Chapungu
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Institute for Corporate Citizenship, University of South Africa, Pretoria 0002, South Africa
Interests: climate change; biodiversity; sustainable development; natural resources management

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The growing linkages between climate change and the global desire to be on a sustainable development trajectory has been elevated by the embedding of climate change action as one of the 17 intertwined Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). SDGs are a forward-looking global development agenda leading to 2030, as formalized by the United Nations General Assembly in September 2015 (United Nations, 2015). While SDGs currently have a timeline to 2030, as presented in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, the climate change agenda, which harnesses several key action areas that include mitigation, adaptation, resilient, and capacity development, as well as technology, education, and awareness raising, remains a long-term challenge for the world. Although many other global challenges such as the Corona virus disease 2019 (COVID 19) can be destructive, climate change remains a huge challenge, particularly for countries in the Global South, whose climate change adaptation capacity is weak (Dube et al., 2021).

Given that the world gets affected by climate change differently, the mechanisms to address this crisis are presented in the Paris Agreement under the custodianship of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCC), and other United Nations agendas that include the Sendai Framework on Disaster Risk Reduction (UNFCCC, 2015; UNDRR, 2014), Habitat III’s New Urban Agenda, and the Voluntary National Review mechanism under the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development (UN Habitat, 2015; United Nations, 2015). Central to the Sendai Framework is the fact that climate change is a natural hazard. The Sendai Framework further highlights the need to build back better (BBB) after disasters strike, and evidence shows that the negative impacts of climate change-induced weather extremes have been on the rise and have slowed sustainable development (Hay and Mimura, 2010; Beer, 2018; Saunders, Kelly, Paisley, and Clarke, 2020). The negative impacts of extreme weather events have come at a huge economic cost to both developed and developing countries. Given the disproportionate impact of extreme weather events, there has been increasing concern for the capacity of developing countries to respond, given the already deep-seated challenges such as poverty, inequality, and unemployment.

The purpose of this Special Issue is to publish academic papers that address the interface and nexus of climate change and sustainable development in the Global South. The work will supplement the bulk of the literature that mainly originates from the developed global north, thereby leaving out some of the details that stakeholders from developing countries experience. Furthermore, as the climate change agenda is set during the UNFCCC and other global negotiation platforms, the Special Issue will also entertain papers that give detailed accounts of the negotiation processes and how developing countries could benefit from understanding such processes and from positioning themselves as equal partners. The Special Issue welcomes manuscripts from the list (but not exclusive) of topics that authors may wish to address, as outlined herein:

  • Climate change and the SDGs (including the domestication and localisation of the climate action, SDG 13)
  • The climate negotiation processes and its implication on the sustainable development agenda in the Global South countries.
  • Disaster risk reduction in the context of climate change and SDGs
  • Renewable energy in the context of climate change and SDGs
  • Increasing risk of tropical cyclones, droughts, heat waves, floods, tornadoes, and other associated climate induced hazards in the Global South
  • Role of institutions in climate mitigation, adaptation, and building resilience
  • Climate change and the blue/ocean economy (SDG 14)
  • Climate change impacts on natural resources
  • Climate change and small island developing states (SIDS)
  • Climate change and livelihoods
  • Climate change, pandemics, and sustainable development
  • Any other relevant topics

References

Beer T. (2018). The Impact of Extreme Weather Events on Food Security. In: Mal S., Singh R., Huggel C. (eds) Climate Change, Extreme Events and Disaster Risk Reduction. Sustainable Development Goals Series. Cham: Springer.

Dube, K., Nhamo, G., & Chikodzi, D. (2021). Rising sea level and its implications on coastal tourism development in Cape Town, South Africa. Journal of Outdoor Recreation and Tourism 33, 100346.

Hay, J., & Mimura, N. (2010). The changing nature of extreme weather and climate events: risks to sustainable development. Geomatics, Natural Hazards and Risk 1, 3–18.

Saunders, W. S., Kelly, S., Paisley, S., & Clarke, L. B. (2020). Progress toward implementing the Sendai framework, the Paris agreement, and the sustainable development goals: Policy from Aotearoa New Zealand. International Journal of Disaster Risk Science 11, 190–205

United Nations Habitat. (2016). Habitat III: New Urban Agenda. New York: United Nations Habitat Secretariat.

UNDRR (United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction). (2015). Sendai Framework on Disaster Risk Reduction (2015–2030). New York: UNDRR Secretariat.

UNFCCC (United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change). (2015). Paris Agreement. Bonn: UNFCCC Secretariat.

United Nations. (2015). Transforming our World: The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. New York: United Nations Secretariat.

Prof. Godwell Nhamo
Dr. Kaitano Dube
Dr. David Chikodzi
Dr. Lazarus Chapungu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • climate change
  • Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)
  • Global South
  • mitigation
  • adaptation
  • resilience
  • politics

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Open AccessArticle
Landing the Climate SDG into South Africa’s Development Trajectory: Mitigation Policies, Strategies and Institutional Setup
Sustainability 2021, 13(5), 2991; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13052991 - 09 Mar 2021
Viewed by 342
Abstract
Landing the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) into national development policies and development trajectories remain one of the desired outcomes to 2030. This paper teases out how South Africa landed the climate action SDG into its development trajectory, with a focus on mitigation policies, [...] Read more.
Landing the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) into national development policies and development trajectories remain one of the desired outcomes to 2030. This paper teases out how South Africa landed the climate action SDG into its development trajectory, with a focus on mitigation policies, strategies and institutional setup. The study uses an online survey, key informant interviews, as well as policy documents and critical discourse analysis. The study concludes that South Africa has landed SDG 13 into its policies designed to respond to climate mitigation. However, there were several inherent challenges in the policies and strategies resulting in implementation inefficiencies, including the fact that the policy on climate change is driven more by international pressures and expectations rather than domestic awareness and activism. There are also challenges with institutional capacity to implement the policies at sub-national levels. Furthermore, reliance on a few experts makes the system vulnerable and fragile. The study also found that not enough is being done to support sustainable consumption and production (SDG 12) as there are energy intensive industries failing to comply with mitigation policies in place. Hence the paper recommends the need to fix the disjuncture between the energy policy and climate mitigation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Climate Change and Sustainable Development in the Global South)
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Open AccessReview
Drought Disaster Risk Adaptation through Ecosystem Services-Based Solutions: Way Forward for South Africa
Sustainability 2021, 13(8), 4132; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13084132 - 08 Apr 2021
Viewed by 299
Abstract
Ecosystem services refer to the direct and indirect benefits to humanity from an ecosystem. The ability to spatially incorporate multiple biophysical environments is crucial to ecosystem services, thus promoting cooperation between science and policy in seeking solutions to global challenges, including drought disasters. [...] Read more.
Ecosystem services refer to the direct and indirect benefits to humanity from an ecosystem. The ability to spatially incorporate multiple biophysical environments is crucial to ecosystem services, thus promoting cooperation between science and policy in seeking solutions to global challenges, including drought disasters. Therefore, understanding ecosystem services, for instance, from forest/vegetation in view of contributing to drought disaster risk adaptation is critical to human-nature interactions and proper sustainable conservation thereof. No known study has been done on ecosystem services and their contributions to drought management or other climate adaptation in South Africa. This study aimed at quantifying drought disaster risk adaptation based on ecosystem services in South Africa. It was identified that ecosystem services to society have been directly affected by anthropogenic and natural phenomena, thereby influencing drought severity and its impacts. These impacts and their associated risks are evident globally, including in South Africa. We found out that ecosystems in South Africa have been affected and extremely vulnerable to recurrent natural disasters, such as droughts. To achieve long-term solutions to such drought-related risks and challenges, feedback mechanisms between human-natural and related factors and ecosystem services-based drought adaptation need to be understood and planned. Timely spatiotemporal assessment, planning and management strategies need to be considered to find solutions or ways forward to South Africa in combating drought disasters. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Climate Change and Sustainable Development in the Global South)
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