Special Issue "Waste Heat Recovery in Sewage Systems, Sewage Installations and Agriculture"

A special issue of Resources (ISSN 2079-9276).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Daniel Słyś
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Infrastructure and Water Management, Rzeszow University of Technology, al. Powstańców Warszawy 6, 35-959 Rzeszów, Poland
Interests: modeling of drainage systems; water management; rainwater harvesting systems; sewage and water supply systems; urban underground infrastructure; green and blue infrastructure; waste heat; heat recorvery; multicriteria decision making
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Agnieszka Stec
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Infrastructure and Water Management, Rzeszow University of Technology, al. Powstańców Warszawy 6, 35-959 Rzeszów, Poland
Interests: alternative water resources; rainwater harvesting systems; renewable energy sources; heat recovery systems; sewage systems; hydrodynamic modeling; life cycle cost analysis
Dr. Sabina Kordana-Obuch
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Infrastructure and Water Management, Rzeszow University of Technology, al. Powstańców Warszawy 6, 35-959 Rzeszów, Poland
Interests: drain water heat recovery; waste heat recovery systems; sewage systems; multicriteria decision making; decision support; stormwater management; best management practices; low impact development; hydrodynamic modeling
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Kamil Pochwat
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Infrastructure and Water Management, Rzeszow University of Technology, al. Powstańców Warszawy 6, 35-959 Rzeszów, Poland
Interests: detention tank; urban environmental engineering; stormwater; urban floods; precipitations; rainfall; hydrodynamic modeling; heat recovery from sewage; water and sewage measurement; SWMM; CFD modeling
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The dynamic economic development of the world is accompanied by a clear increase in energy demand. An important part of this demand is energy used in housing industry and agriculture, especially for hot water production. The current development of technology allows for the operation of waste heat recovery processes from graywater at all stages of their generation, transport, and reprocessing. It is obvious that heat recovered from greywater will not solve the problem of global energy shortages. However, this may be a factor that improves the energy efficiency of both the housing industry and processes related to plant production and animal breeding. The use of waste heat leads to a reduction in the consumption of energy produced from fossil fuels, and thus to reducing greenhouse gas emissions and environmental degradation. In addition, in many cases, the use of heat recovery systems is financially beneficial for investors.

Prof. Dr. Daniel Słyś
Dr. Agnieszka Stec
Dr. Sabina Kordana
Dr. Kamil Pochwat
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Resources is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • waste heat recovery
  • drain water heat recovery
  • DWHR
  • energy efficiency
  • financial efficiency
  • green building
  • low-energy house
  • agriculture

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Article
Modelling the Steady-State Performance of Coiled Falling-Film Drain Water Heat Recovery Systems Using Rated Data
Resources 2020, 9(6), 69; https://doi.org/10.3390/resources9060069 - 06 Jun 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1550
Abstract
Falling-film drain water heat recovery (DWHR) systems are heat exchangers used to recover energy from warm water travelling down vertical drainpipes. DWHR systems are rated at constant inlet temperatures at multiple flow rates while maintaining an equal flow rate through both sides of [...] Read more.
Falling-film drain water heat recovery (DWHR) systems are heat exchangers used to recover energy from warm water travelling down vertical drainpipes. DWHR systems are rated at constant inlet temperatures at multiple flow rates while maintaining an equal flow rate through both sides of the heat exchanger. The outcome of the rating system is an effectiveness value that is the main metric used to sell DWHR systems to the public. Unfortunately, the rated conditions may not be representative of what occurs during operation in a typical house. The present work aims to bridge this gap by presenting several semi-empirical correlations that are combined into a model capable of predicting the steady-state performance of a DWHR system at variable temperatures and flow rates, based on data generated during the rating process. This model is then validated experimentally for eight different DWHR systems for a total of 135 validation cases. The results show that the model is very effective at estimating the performance of DWHR systems for validation cases, and the mean absolute percentage error for the model predictions versus the experimental results is less than 3%. Full article
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Article
Hybrid Domestic Hot Water System Performance in Industrial Hall
Resources 2020, 9(6), 65; https://doi.org/10.3390/resources9060065 - 30 May 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1530
Abstract
The renewable and waste heat sources implemented for the preparation of domestic hot water (DHW) allow for energy conservation and environment protection along with resource savings and economic benefits. The solutions, including non-conventional sources, are especially demanded in large halls in which energy [...] Read more.
The renewable and waste heat sources implemented for the preparation of domestic hot water (DHW) allow for energy conservation and environment protection along with resource savings and economic benefits. The solutions, including non-conventional sources, are especially demanded in large halls in which energy and water consumption are crucial for maintenance costs. In this article, energy analysis of a DHW preparation system for workers’ hygienic purposes in a industrial hall was performed. The DHW preparation system consisted of three sources: a flue gases heat exchanger as the waste heat source, solar collectors as the renewable heat source and a gas boiler as the conventional source. In the analysis, data of a variable-temperature supply of water and hourly water consumption data from the measurements in the industrial hall, located in Poland, were applied. The results for all of the 8760 h of one year were examined. The analysis outcomes show that implementation of non-conventional sources can supply 81.4% of energy needed for DHW preparation, avoiding a lot of running costs; just 18.6% of heat demand had to be obtained from a gas boiler. The analysis also confirms that the system may operate correctly when the appropriate device size is applied, along with a proper control strategy that avoids overheating water and uses alternative sources. Full article
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Review

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Review
Critical Analysis of the Current State of Knowledge in the Field of Waste Heat Recovery in Sewage Systems
Resources 2020, 9(6), 72; https://doi.org/10.3390/resources9060072 - 08 Jun 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1955
Abstract
The need for efficient use of energy and sustainable energy management and the fact that large quantities of heat are deposited in the discharged sewage have contributed to the development of research on waste heat recovery. Gray water began to be seen not [...] Read more.
The need for efficient use of energy and sustainable energy management and the fact that large quantities of heat are deposited in the discharged sewage have contributed to the development of research on waste heat recovery. Gray water began to be seen not just as waste, but also as an alternative source of energy. Research related to the development, improvement, and finally, the popularization of waste energy recovery devices and systems has evolved rapidly over the last two decades. Initially, technologies for gray water reuse were not widely used, which was due to the low efficiency of the current heat exchangers and the significant investment outlays that would have to be covered by potential users. Research conducted by scientists from around the world has allowed us to eliminate construction flaws, improve efficiency, and also provide information on the selection of optimal waste heat recovery technology, depending on the installation conditions and operating parameters. The ability to correctly select the device allows for effective energy collection from gray water, which improves the investment profitability. This paper reviews the research regarding issues related to waste heat recovery from gray water in sewage installations and systems. A critical analysis of the current state of knowledge was carried out with a special consideration to the technologies intended for the residential buildings. Full article
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