Special Issue "Post-GWAS Era in Psychiatric Research: Future Perspectives"

A special issue of Psych (ISSN 2624-8611). This special issue belongs to the section "Neuropsychology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 September 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Vladimir Vladimirov
Website
Guest Editor
1. Department of Psychiatry, Virginia Institute for Psychiatric and Behavioral Genetics, Richmond, VA 23219-1534, USA
2. Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Center for Biomarker Research and Precision Medicine, School of Pharmacy, Virginia Commonwealth University, 907 Floyd Ave, Richmond, VA 23284, USA
3. Lieber Institute for Brain Development, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
Interests: GWAS; miRNA; eQTLs; gene expression; postmortem brain espression studies
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Large scale meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have reliably identified genetic polymorphisms associated with neuropsychiatric disorders and substance use disorders. However, the main challenge for psychiatric research in the next decade will be discovering the functional consequences of such associated risk genetic variants. We have already begun to see some strides in this direction by the increasing number of reports attempting to identify the functional relevance of disease-associated variants via the use of expression quantitative loci (eQTL) studies. Thus, in this special issue of Psych journal our goal is to invite peer review studies describing both original work and literature reviews, covering a wide range of topics including, but not limited, to genetic and molecular expression studies, as well as development of novel methodological analyses for analysis of various genomic datasets (and/or innovative use of existing methods to improve the use of currently existing genomic databases) with the ultimate goal of increasing our understanding of the functional impact of disease risk eQTLs.

Dr. Vladimir Vladimirov
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Psych is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Psychiatric Genetics
  • Neuroscience
  • Gene Expression
  • miRNA
  • eQTL
  • computational genomics

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Self-Body Recognition through a Mirror: Easing Spatial-Consistency Requirements for Rubber Hand Illusion
Psych 2020, 2(2), 114-127; https://doi.org/10.3390/psych2020011 - 21 Jun 2020
Abstract
Considering that humans recognize mirror images as copies of the real world despite misinterpreting optical reflections, spatial disagreement may be accepted in rubber hand illusion (RHI) settings when a mirror is used to show a fake hand. The present study performed two experiments [...] Read more.
Considering that humans recognize mirror images as copies of the real world despite misinterpreting optical reflections, spatial disagreement may be accepted in rubber hand illusion (RHI) settings when a mirror is used to show a fake hand. The present study performed two experiments to reveal how self-body recognition of a fake hand via a mirror affects RHI. First, we tested whether illusory ownership of a fake hand seen in a mirror could be induced in our experimental environment (screening experiment). Subjective evaluations using an RHI questionnaire demonstrated that embodiment of the rubber hand was evoked in the presence or absence of a mirror. We then examined whether using a mirror image for RHI allows disagreement in orientation (45 ) between the rubber and actual hands (main experiment). The participants experienced RHI even when the actual and rubber hands were incongruent in terms of orientation. These findings suggest that using a mirror masks subtle spatial incongruency or degrades the contribution of visual cues for spatial recognition and facilitates multisensory integration for bodily illusions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Post-GWAS Era in Psychiatric Research: Future Perspectives)
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