Special Issue "Particle-Laden Fluid Interfaces: Dynamics and Interfacial Rheology"

A special issue of Processes (ISSN 2227-9717). This special issue belongs to the section "Materials Processes".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 August 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Eduardo Guzmán
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Physical Chemistry, Complutense University of Madrid, Spain
Interests: Polyelectrolyte, surfactants, interfaces, polymer, layer by layer, colloids, emulsions, interfacial rheology, biophysics
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Armando Maestro
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble, France
Interests: interfaces; polymer; colloids; foams; neutron scattering; interfacial rheology; biophysics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The interaction of particles and fluid interfaces is ubiquitous in science and technology, playing an important role in several aspects of modern life ranging from the stabilization of emulsions and foams with dietary interest to toxicity aspects associated with the inhalation of environmental aerosols, and from tertiary oil recovery processes to the design of hierarchical functional materials. Interest in particle-laden interfaces has driven important research efforts to unravel the physico-chemical bases governing the formation and properties of this type of system. Therefore, our understanding of the theoretical and practical aspects of particle-laden interfaces is paramount. This Special issue is devoted to fundamental and applied aspects of the study of particles at fluid interfaces to provide a comprehensive perspective on the current status of this important research field. It is expected that this will help to provide a bridge between the most fundamental knowledge on particle-laden interfaces and the development of new applications based on such systems.

This Special Issue on “Particle-laden fluid interfaces” aims to collect high-quality research studies addressing challenges in the broad area of process modeling and control in stand-alone or individual systems. Topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Characterization of particle-laden interfaces;
  • Interfacial rheology of particles at fluid interfaces;
  • Dynamics and structure of particle-laden interfaces;
  • Active particles at fluid interfaces;
  • Stabilization of foams and emulsions using particles; and
  • Toxicity aspects of inhaled particles.

Dr. Eduardo Guzmán
Dr. Armando Maestro
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Processes is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Please note that for papers submitted after 30 June 2020 an APC of 1500 CHF applies. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • nanoparticles
  • microparticles
  • fluid interfaces
  • interfacial rheology
  • Pickering emulsions
  • particle-stabilized foams
  • dispersed systems
  • toxicity

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Influence of Carbon Nanosheets on the Behavior of 1,2-Dipalmitoyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphocholine Langmuir Monolayers
Processes 2020, 8(1), 94; https://doi.org/10.3390/pr8010094 - 10 Jan 2020
Abstract
Carbon nanomaterials are widespread in the atmospheric aerosol as a result of the combustion processes and their extensive industrial use. This has raised many question about the potential toxicity associated with the inhalation of such nanoparticles, and its incorporation into the lung surfactant [...] Read more.
Carbon nanomaterials are widespread in the atmospheric aerosol as a result of the combustion processes and their extensive industrial use. This has raised many question about the potential toxicity associated with the inhalation of such nanoparticles, and its incorporation into the lung surfactant layer. In order to shed light on the main physical bases underlying the incorporation of carbon nanomaterials into lung surfactant layers, this work has studied the interaction at the water/vapor interface of carbon nanosheets (CN) with Langmuir monolayers of 1,2-Dipalmitoyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphocholine (DPPC), with this lipid being the main component of lung surfactant layers and responsible of some of the most relevant features of such film. The incorporation of CN into DPPC Langmuir monolayers modifies the lateral organization of the DPPC at the interface, which is explained on the basis of two different effects: (i) particles occupy part of the interfacial area, and (ii) impoverishment of the lipid composition of the interface due to lipid adsorption onto the CN surface. This results in a worsening of the mechanical performance of the monolayers which may present a negative impact in the physiological performance of lung surfactant. It would be expected that the results obtained here can be useful as a step toward the understanding of the most fundamental physico-chemical bases associated with the effect of inhaled particles in the respiratory cycle. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Particle-Laden Fluid Interfaces: Dynamics and Interfacial Rheology)
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Review

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Open AccessFeature PaperReview
Colloids at Fluid Interfaces
Processes 2019, 7(12), 942; https://doi.org/10.3390/pr7120942 - 10 Dec 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Over the last two decades, understanding of the attachment of colloids to fluid interfaces has attracted the interest of researchers from different fields. This is explained by considering the ubiquity of colloidal and interfacial systems in nature and technology. However, to date, the [...] Read more.
Over the last two decades, understanding of the attachment of colloids to fluid interfaces has attracted the interest of researchers from different fields. This is explained by considering the ubiquity of colloidal and interfacial systems in nature and technology. However, to date, the control and tuning of the assembly of colloids at fluid interfaces remain a challenge. This review discusses some of the most fundamental aspects governing the organization of colloidal objects at fluid interfaces, paying special attention to spherical particles. This requires a description of different physicochemical aspects, from the driving force involved in the assembly to its thermodynamic description, and from the interactions involved in the assembly to the dynamics and rheological behavior of particle-laden interfaces. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Particle-Laden Fluid Interfaces: Dynamics and Interfacial Rheology)
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