Special Issue "Recent Advances of Metal Organic Frameworks Materials"

A special issue of Processes (ISSN 2227-9717). This special issue belongs to the section "Materials Processes".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Nicola Gargiulo
Website
Guest Editor
ACLabs—Applied Chemistry Labs, Department of Chemical, Materials and Industrial Production Engineering, University of Naples Federico II, P.le V. Tecchio 80, Naples 80125, Italy
Interests: nanoporous materials (zeolites, mesoporous silicates, metal organic frameworks); adsorption; controlled release; bioactive materials; antibacterial materials; hemostatic materials
Dr. Antonio Peluso

Guest Editor
CLabs—Applied Chemistry Labs, Department of Chemical, Materials and Industrial Production Engineering, University of Naples Federico II, P.le V. Tecchio 80, Naples 80125, Italy
Interests: nanoporous materials (zeolites, mesoporous silicates, metal organic frameworks); adsorption; carbon nanotubes; polymer composites

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,


During the last 15 years, metal organic frameworks (MOFs) have been the class of ordered nanoporous materials that have received the most attention from the scientific community. As an example, more than 27,000 Scopus-indexed papers in the 2004–2019 time period contain the term “metal organic framework” in their title, abstract, and/or keywords.

This Special Issue on “Recent Advances in Metal Organic Frameworks Materials” aims to curate novel advances in the synthesis, characterization, and utilization of MOFs to address longstanding challenges in chemical processes and other relevant applications. Topics include, but are not limited to:

  • development of new MOF structures (computational design, high-throughput synthesis, etc.);
  • recent advances in the characterization of MOFs (customization of current techniques, new methodologies);
  • application of MOFs in chemical processes (gas or liquid adsorption, catalysis, etc.); and
  • other applications of MOFs (drug delivery, biomedicine, electronics, etc.).

Dr. Nicola Gargiulo
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Processes is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Please note that for papers submitted after 30 June 2020 an APC of 1500 CHF applies. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • metal organic frameworks (MOFs)
  • synthesis
  • characterization
  • adsorption
  • gas storage
  • catalysis
  • drug delivery
  • biological imaging
  • MOFs as semiconductors

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Synthesis and Characterization of New Lithium and Boron Based Metal Organic Frameworks with NLO Properties for Application in Neutron Capture Therapy
Processes 2020, 8(5), 558; https://doi.org/10.3390/pr8050558 - 09 May 2020
Abstract
In this work, we synthetized and characterized new crystalline materials with theranostic properties, i.e., they can be used both as bio-sensors and for “drug delivery”. The two solid crystalline compounds studied are Metal Organic Frameworks and have formulas Li[(C6H12O [...] Read more.
In this work, we synthetized and characterized new crystalline materials with theranostic properties, i.e., they can be used both as bio-sensors and for “drug delivery”. The two solid crystalline compounds studied are Metal Organic Frameworks and have formulas Li[(C6H12O6)2B]·2H2O and Li[(C4H2O6)2B]·5.5H2O. They can be synthetized both with natural isotopes of Li and B or with 6Li and 10B isotopes, that can be explored for Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT) for anti-cancer treatment. The presence of chiral organic molecules, such as mannitol and tartaric acid, provides the NLO property to the crystals and thus their capability to generate the Second Harmonic, which is useful for applications as bio-sensors. The two compounds were characterized with X-ray Diffraction and the Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) responses were estimated by theoretical calculations, and the results were compared with experimental measurements of powdered samples. In order to test the behavior of such compounds under thermal neutron irradiation, we preliminary exposed one of the two compounds in the e_LiBANS facility at the Torino Physics Department. Preliminary results are reported. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances of Metal Organic Frameworks Materials)
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Review

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Open AccessFeature PaperReview
MOF-Based Adsorbents for Atmospheric Emission Control: A Review
Processes 2020, 8(5), 613; https://doi.org/10.3390/pr8050613 - 21 May 2020
Abstract
This review focuses on the use of metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) for adsorbing gas species that are known to weaken the thermal self-regulation capacities of Earth’s atmosphere. A large section is dedicated to the adsorption of carbon dioxide, while another section is dedicated to [...] Read more.
This review focuses on the use of metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) for adsorbing gas species that are known to weaken the thermal self-regulation capacities of Earth’s atmosphere. A large section is dedicated to the adsorption of carbon dioxide, while another section is dedicated to the adsorption of other different gas typologies, whose emissions, for various reasons, represent a “wound” for Earth’s atmosphere. High emphasis is given to MOFs that have moved enough ahead in their development process to be currently considered as potentially usable in “real-world” (i.e., out-of-lab) adsorption processes. As a result, there is strong evidence of a wide gap between laboratory results and the industrial implementation of MOF-based adsorbents. Indeed, when a MOF that performs well in a specific process is commercially available in large quantities, economic observations still make designers tend toward more traditional adsorbents. Moreover, there are cases in which a specific MOF remarkably outperforms the currently employed adsorbents, but it is not industrially produced, thus strongly limiting its possibilities in large-scale use. To overcome such limitations, it is hoped that the chemical industry will be able to provide more and more mass-produced MOFs at increasingly competitive costs in the future. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances of Metal Organic Frameworks Materials)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Recent Progress of Uranium Contamination Remediation by Metal Organic Frameworks
Authors: Wei Liu
Affiliation: School of Environment and Material Engineering, Yantai University, Yantai 264005, P. R. China
Abstract: Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have received ever increasing attention in recent decades due to its diversified structures, tunable pore size/shape and facile functionalization. This class of crystallized porous material has been widely investigated in a variety of applications such as gas separation and storage, catalysts, optical materials, and adsorbents. In which, radioactive contamination remediation by MOFs was firstly investigated by Lin et. in 2013 (Chem. Sci. 2013, 4, 2396-2402). In comparation with the traditional sorption materials (e.g. polymers and carbon materials) that applied in this area, MOFs exhibit much better performance in terms of selectively, accessibility and capacity. Polymers have some advantages for uranyl ions adsorption, however, due to the disorder nature of the polymer material, the specific area of polymers is much smaller than that of MOFs. The driven forth of adsorption only comes from the interaction between the functional group that seated on the skeleton and uranyl ions in the solution, which could be considered as the major limitation. Carbon-based materials exhibit better physical properties and adsorption capacity, however the adsorption selectivity and capacity greatly impaired by the limited surface area and amounts of functional group. MOFs generally have three advantages over the well-developed materials: (i) The structure of MOFs could be accurately determined through single crystal structure analysis, which provide us the possibility of adsorption mechanism explanation. (ii) The framework of MOFs is constructed by self-assemble of metal centers and organic ligands which endow this material facile functionalization by replacing the metal centers or organic ligands. (iii) High porosity and specific surface area provide sufficient space for housing urnayl ions. These characters not only greatly benefit for improving the adsorption capacity but also provide opportunity for increasing the contact probability between the uranyl ions and functional groups. There are three major types of MOF materials are currently investigated for uranium contamination remediation including ZIF, MIL and UiO series. Although these MOFs show distinct performance in terms of urayl uptake, further utilization of this material for industrial purpose is still in fancy. In this review, the current development status of MOFs for uranium contamination removal will be systematically discussed including the advantages and limitations of MOFs compared with conventional adsorbents and the inherent sorption mechanisms. Special emphasis will be directed at the relation between the structure and function, which may provide us instructional design strategy for further improving the sorption performance. Some pertinent development guidance in the further MOF chemistry toward uranium decontamination will also be proposed.

Title: Synthesis and characterization of new lithium and boron based Metal organic Frameworks with NLO properties for application in Boron neutron capture therapy
Authors: Domenica Marabello
Affiliation: Univ Turin, Dipartimento Chim, Via P Giuria 7, I-10125 Turin, Italy
Abstract: In this work we synthetized and characterized new Metal Organic Frameworks crystalline materials with theranostic properties, i.e. that can be used contemporary as bio-sensors and for drug delivery. The two solid crystalline compounds studied have formula 6Li[(C6H12O6)210B]·2H2O and 6Li[(C4H4O6)2B]·5.5H2O and contain the 6Li and 10B isotope, used in Boron Neutron Capture cancer therapy (BNCT), connected to a chiral organic small molecule (mannitol and tartaric acid, respectively) that provides the NLO property to the crystal. The synthesis methods and X-ray crystal structure determination were reported. The SHG response of these two compounds was estimated by theoretical calculations, and compared with experimental measurements of powdered samples.

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