Special Issue "Polymer Biointerfaces II"

A special issue of Polymers (ISSN 2073-4360). This special issue belongs to the section "Polymer Analysis and Characterization".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 10 May 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Assoc. Prof. Dr. Marián Lehocký
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1 Faculty of Technology, Tomas Bata University in Zlín, Zlín, Czech Republic 2 Centre of Polymer Systems, Tomas Bata University in Zlín, Zlín, Czech Republic
Interests: polymer surfaces; surface modification; polymer–cell interaction; polymer surface characterization; polymer biomaterials
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Priscilla Amaral
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Biochemical Engineering Department, School of Chemistry, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
Interests: Biotechnology; enzyme immobilization; cell adhesion; nano–bio interfaces; polymer–cell interaction; polymer biomaterials.

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Polymer biointerfaces are considered a suitable alternative to the improvement and development of numerous applications. The optimization of polymer surface properties can control several biological processes, such as cell adhesion, proliferation, viability, and enhanced extracellular matrix secretion functions at biointerfaces.

This Special Issue, entitled “Polymer Biointerfaces II”, is focused on fundamental and applied research on polymers and systems with biological origin. Submissions should contain both polymer material background and descriptions of interacting biological phenomena or relevance to prospective applications in biomedical, biochemical, biophysical, biotechnological, food, pharmaceutical, or cosmetic fields.

Special attention will be given to polymer biosurface modification, biocoatings, cell–polymer surface interactions, polymer–extracellular-matrix interactions, self-assembling monolayers on polymers, in vivo and in vitro systems, protein–polymer surface interaction, polysaccharide–polymer interactions, biotribology, biochip, biosensors, nano–bio interfaces, coatings, biofilms, adhesion phenomena, and molecular recognition.

This Special Issue is a continuation of a previous Special Issue entitled “Polymer Biointerfaces”.

Prof. Dr. Marián Lehocký
Prof. Dr. Priscilla Amaral
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Polymers is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • polymer surface
  • biointerface
  • polymer–cell interaction
  • polymer modification
  • polymer biomaterials
  • biofilms
  • biotribology
  • biochip
  • nano–bio interfaces
  • polymer surface interaction

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Plasma Mediated Chlorhexidine Immobilization onto Polylactic Acid Surface via Carbodiimide Chemistry: Antibacterial and Cytocompatibility Assessment
Polymers 2021, 13(8), 1201; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym13081201 - 08 Apr 2021
Viewed by 279
Abstract
The development of antibacterial materials has great importance in avoiding bacterial contamination and the risk of infection for implantable biomaterials. An antibacterial thin film coating on the surface via chemical bonding is a promising technique to keep native bulk material properties unchanged. However, [...] Read more.
The development of antibacterial materials has great importance in avoiding bacterial contamination and the risk of infection for implantable biomaterials. An antibacterial thin film coating on the surface via chemical bonding is a promising technique to keep native bulk material properties unchanged. However, most of the polymeric materials are chemically inert and highly hydrophobic, which makes chemical agent coating challenging Herein, immobilization of chlorhexidine, a broad-spectrum bactericidal cationic compound, onto the polylactic acid surface was performed in a multistep physicochemical method. Direct current plasma was used for surface functionalization, followed by carbodiimide chemistry to link the coupling reagents of N-(3-Dimethylaminopropyl)-N′-ethylcarbodiimide hydrochloride (EDAC) and N-Hydroxysuccinimide (NHs) to create a free bonding site to anchor the chlorhexidine. Surface characterizations were performed by water contact angle test, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The antibacterial activity was tested using Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. Finally, in vitro cytocompatibility of the samples was studied using primary mouse embryonic fibroblast cells. It was found that all samples were cytocompatible and the best antibacterial performance observed was the Chlorhexidine immobilized sample after NHs activation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polymer Biointerfaces II)
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Open AccessArticle
Slippery Liquid-Infused Porous Polymeric Surfaces Based on Natural Oil with Antimicrobial Effect
Polymers 2021, 13(2), 206; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym13020206 - 08 Jan 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 505
Abstract
Many polymer materials have found a wide variety of applications in biomedical industries due to their excellent mechanical properties. However, the infections associated with the biofilm formation represent serious problems resulting from the initial bacterial attachment on the polymeric surface. The development of [...] Read more.
Many polymer materials have found a wide variety of applications in biomedical industries due to their excellent mechanical properties. However, the infections associated with the biofilm formation represent serious problems resulting from the initial bacterial attachment on the polymeric surface. The development of novel slippery liquid-infused porous surfaces (SLIPSs) represents promising method for the biofilm formation prevention. These surfaces are characterized by specific microstructural roughness able to hold lubricants inside. The lubricants create a slippery layer for the repellence of various liquids, such as water and blood. In this study, effective antimicrobial modifications of polyethylene (PE) and polyurethane (PU), as commonly used medical polymers, were investigated. For this purpose, low-temperature plasma treatment was used initially for activation of the polymeric surface, thereby enhancing surface and adhesion properties. Subsequently, preparation of porous microstructures was achieved by electrospinning technique using polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) in combination with polyamide (PA). Finally, natural black seed oil (BSO) infiltrated the produced fiber mats acting as a lubricating layer. The optimized fiber mats’ production was achieved using PDMS/PA mixture at ratio 1:1:20 (g/g/mL) using isopropyl alcohol as solvent. The surface properties of produced slippery surfaces were analyzed by various microscopic and optics techniques to obtain information about wettability, sliding behavior and surface morphology/topography. The modified PE and PU substrates demonstrated slippery behavior of an impinged water droplet at a small tilting angle. Moreover, the antimicrobial effects of the produced SLIPs using black seed oil were proven against Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and Gram-negative Escherichia coli (E. coli). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polymer Biointerfaces II)
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Open AccessArticle
Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Polymerized 2-Ethyl-2-oxazoline Based Thin Films for Biomedical Purposes
Polymers 2020, 12(11), 2679; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym12112679 - 13 Nov 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 458
Abstract
Polyoxazoline thin coatings were deposited on glass substrates using atmospheric pressure plasma polymerization from 2-ethyl-2-oxazoline vapours. The plasma polymerization was performed in dielectric barrier discharge burning in nitrogen at atmospheric pressure. The thin films stable in aqueous environments were obtained at the deposition [...] Read more.
Polyoxazoline thin coatings were deposited on glass substrates using atmospheric pressure plasma polymerization from 2-ethyl-2-oxazoline vapours. The plasma polymerization was performed in dielectric barrier discharge burning in nitrogen at atmospheric pressure. The thin films stable in aqueous environments were obtained at the deposition with increased substrate temperature, which was changed from 20 C to 150 C. The thin film deposited samples were highly active against both S. aureus and E. coli strains in general. The chemical composition of polyoxazoline films was studied by FTIR and XPS, the mechanical properties of films were studied by depth sensing indentation technique and by scratch tests. The film surface properties were studied by AFM and by surface energy measurement. After tuning the deposition parameters (i.e., monomer flow rate and substrate temperature), stable films, which resist bacterial biofilm formation and have cell-repellent properties, were achieved. Such antibiofouling polyoxazoline thin films can have many potential biomedical applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polymer Biointerfaces II)
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