Special Issue "Polymeric Materials for Electrical Applications"

A special issue of Polymers (ISSN 2073-4360). This special issue belongs to the section "Polymer Applications".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2019.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Vicente Compañ Moreno
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Department of Applied Thermodynamics, Polytechnic University of Valencia, 46022 Valencia, Spain
Interests: Polymer electrolytes; Ionic-exchange membranes; Ionic conductivity; Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS); mixed-matrix membranes (MMMs); Membrane–electrode assembly (MEA); Protonic-Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Applications (PEMFC); Fuel Cell Performance; Direct Methanol Fuel Cells (DMFCs); Batteries; Supercapacitors; Composite membranes containing PEDOT; Polypyrrol; Graphene
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Jorge Escorihuela Fuentes
E-Mail Website
Co-Guest Editor
Department of Organic Chemistry, University of Valencia, 46100 Valencia, Spain
Interests: organic chemistry; polymer electrolytes; ionic liquids (ILs); ionic-exchange membranes; ionic conductivity; electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS); mixed-matrix membranes (MMMs); membrane–electrode assembly (MEA); protonic-exchange membrane fuel cell applications (PEMFC); fuel cell performance; direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs); batteries; supercapacitors; composite membranes containing PEDOT; polypyrrol; graphene
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Alternative methods to generate electricity with high efficiency, minimum production of greenhouse gases, and reduced reliance on fossil fuels need to be sought to sustain a growing society.

Batteries and fuel cells have been proposed as potential candidates for various applications, such as transportation, distributed power, and portable devices. This Special Issue discusses the development of polymer electrolyte membranes and new materials for electrical applications. Polymer electrolytes are promising materials for a wide variety of applications in electrochemical devices, such as rechargeable batteries, supercapacitors, fuel cells, electrodes, and others. It is known that ionic diffusivity in polymeric membranes is closely related to their structural dynamics controlled by the large-amplitude structural rearrangement of polymer segments, the transition temperature, the rigidity and fragility of polymers. During the last years, the main line of research in this area has been focused on the design of polymers to overcome the limitations of the materials currently available for this type of application. The majority of studies have been looking for polymers with good mechanical properties, excellent chemical stability, and high conductivity. The strategies followed have been: the design of mixed-matrix membranes (MMMs) based on conductive polymers and the incorporation of nanofillers (zeolitic imidazolate frameworks (ZIFs), the use of metal–organic frameworks (MOFs)), the increase of tortuosity and reduction of crossover, the use of nanofibers to improve the conductivity and mechanical properties, and the incorporation of ionic liquids (ILs) to increase the conductivity without the need to keep the polymer hydrated. In this Special Issue of Polymers, we wish to bring together works that can be a reference for the industry, for the present and future construction of devices using rechargeable batteries, supercapacitors, electrodes, catalysts, and fuel cells. This Special Issue is for researchers and technologists interested in all aspects of the science, technology, and applications of sources of electrochemical power. It will feature original research papers and reviews about materials science, with applications linked to batteries, supercapacitors, proton-exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) working at moderate and high temperatures, alcohol fuel cells (AFCs), phosphoric acid fuel cells (PAFCs), solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), molten-carbonate fuel cells (MCFCs), microbial fuel cels (MFCs), and photo-electrochemical cells. Topics considered include the research, development, and applications of materials and novel components for these devices.

We invite scientists working in the area of polymeric materials to contribute to this Special Issue, through work related to: membranes, polymeric material selection, and catalysts design (membranes, anode, cathode, electrolytes, interconnections, sealants).

Electrochemical materials and mechanical characterization and properties;
Stack configuration and design;
Transport (proton, electron, mass transport);
Reliability and degradation;
Modelling;
Application of proton-exchange membrane fuel cells, alcohol fuel cells, and microbiale fuel cells;
Batteries.

Prof. Dr. Vicente Compañ Moreno
Guest Editors
Dr. Jorge Escorihuela Fuentes
co-Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Polymers is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Related Special Issues

Published Papers (5 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Experimental Characterization of Polymer Surfaces Subject to Corona Discharges in Controlled Atmospheres
Polymers 2019, 11(10), 1646; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym11101646 - 10 Oct 2019
Abstract
Polymeric dielectrics are employed extensively in the power transmission industry, thanks to their excellent properties; however, under normal operating conditions these materials tend to degrade and fail. In this study, samples of low-density polyethylene, polypropylene, polymethyl methacrylate, and polytetrafluorethylene were subjected to corona [...] Read more.
Polymeric dielectrics are employed extensively in the power transmission industry, thanks to their excellent properties; however, under normal operating conditions these materials tend to degrade and fail. In this study, samples of low-density polyethylene, polypropylene, polymethyl methacrylate, and polytetrafluorethylene were subjected to corona discharges under nitrogen and air atmospheres. The discharges introduced structural modifications over the polymer surface. From a chemical perspective, the alterations are analogous among the non-fluorinated polymers (i.e., polyethylene (PE), polypropylene (PP), and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA)). A simulation of the corona discharge allowed the identification of highly reactive species in the proximity of the surface. The results are consistent with the degradation of insulating polymers in high-voltage applications due to internal partial discharges that ultimately lead to the breakdown of the material. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polymeric Materials for Electrical Applications)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle
Fabrication of ZnO-Al2O3-PTFE Multilayer Nano-Structured Functional Film on Cellulose Insulation Polymer Surface and Its Effect on Moisture Inhibition and Dielectric Properties
Polymers 2019, 11(8), 1367; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym11081367 - 19 Aug 2019
Abstract
After a century of practice, cellulose insulating polymer (insulating paper/pressboard) has been shown to be one of the best and most widely used insulating materials in power transformers. However, with the increased voltage level of the transformer, research has focused on improving the [...] Read more.
After a century of practice, cellulose insulating polymer (insulating paper/pressboard) has been shown to be one of the best and most widely used insulating materials in power transformers. However, with the increased voltage level of the transformer, research has focused on improving the insulation performance of the transformer’s cellulose insulation polymer. Considering the complex environment of the transformer, it is not enough to improve the single performance of the insulating polymer. In this study, a nano-structured ZnO-Al2O3-PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene) multifunctional film was deposited on the surface of insulating pressboard by radio frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering. The effect of the multilayered ZnO-Al2O3-PTFE functional film on the dielectric and water contact angle of the cellulose insulating polymer was investigated. The scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectrometry (SEM/EDS) showed that the nano-structured ZnO-Al2O3-PTFE functional film was successfully deposited on the cellulose insulation pressboard surface. The functional film presented an obvious stratification phenomenon. By analyzing the result of the contact angle, it was found that the functional film shields the hydroxyl group of the inner cellulose and improves hydrophobicity. The AC breakdown field strength of the treated samples was obviously increased (by 12 to ~17%), which means that the modified samples had a better dielectric insulation performance. This study provides a surface modification method to comprehensively improve electrical properties and the ability to inhibit the moisture of the cellulose insulating polymer, used in a power transformer. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polymeric Materials for Electrical Applications)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Water-Dispersed Poly(p-Phenylene Terephthamide) Boosting Nano-Al2O3-Coated Polyethylene Separator with Enhanced Thermal Stability and Ion Diffusion for Lithium-Ion Batteries
Polymers 2019, 11(8), 1362; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym11081362 - 18 Aug 2019
Abstract
Polyethylene (PE) membranes coated with nano-Al2O3 have been improved with water-dispersed poly(p-phenylene terephthamide) (PPTA). From the scanning electron microscope (SEM) images, it can be seen that a layer with a honeycombed porous structure is formed on the membrane. The thus-formed [...] Read more.
Polyethylene (PE) membranes coated with nano-Al2O3 have been improved with water-dispersed poly(p-phenylene terephthamide) (PPTA). From the scanning electron microscope (SEM) images, it can be seen that a layer with a honeycombed porous structure is formed on the membrane. The thus-formed composite separator imbibed with the electrolyte solution has an ionic conductivity of 0.474 mS/cm with an electrolyte uptake of 335%. At 175 °C, the assembled battery from the synthesized composite separator explodes at 3200 s, which is five times longer than the battery assembled from an Al2O3-coated polyethylene (PE) membrane. The open circuit voltage of the assembled battery using a composite separator drops to zero at 600 s at an operating temperature of 185 °C, while the explosion of the battery with Al2O3-coated PE occurs at 250 s. More importantly, the interface resistance of the cell assembled from the composite separator decreases to 65 Ω. Hence, as the discharge rate increases from 0.2 to 1.0 C, the discharge capacity of the battery using composite separator retains 93.5%. Under 0.5 C, the discharge capacity retention remains 99.4% of its initial discharge capacity after 50 charge–discharge cycles. The results described here demonstrate that Al2O3/PPTA-coated polyethylene membranes have superior thermal stability and ion diffusion. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polymeric Materials for Electrical Applications)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Protic Imidazolium Polymer as Ion Conductor for Improved Oxygen Evolution Performance
Polymers 2019, 11(8), 1268; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym11081268 - 31 Jul 2019
Abstract
Improving the electrocatalytic performance of oxygen evolution reaction (OER) is essential for oxygen-involved electrochemical devices, including water splitting and rechargeable metal–air batteries. In this work, we report that the OER performance of commercial catalysts of IrO2, Co3O4, [...] Read more.
Improving the electrocatalytic performance of oxygen evolution reaction (OER) is essential for oxygen-involved electrochemical devices, including water splitting and rechargeable metal–air batteries. In this work, we report that the OER performance of commercial catalysts of IrO2, Co3O4, and Pt-C can be improved by replacing the traditional Nafion® ionomer with newly synthesized copolymers consisting of protonated imidazolium moieties such as ion conductors and binders in electrodes. Specifically, such an improvement in OER performance for all the tested catalysts is more significant in basic and neutral environments than that under acidic conditions. We anticipate that the results will provide new ideas for the conceptual design of electrodes for oxygen-involved electrochemical devices. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polymeric Materials for Electrical Applications)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Proton Conductivity through Polybenzimidazole Composite Membranes Containing Silica Nanofiber Mats
Polymers 2019, 11(7), 1182; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym11071182 - 14 Jul 2019
Abstract
The quest for sustainable and more efficient energy-converting devices has been the focus of researchers′ efforts in the past decades. In this study, SiO2 nanofiber mats were fabricated through an electrospinning process and later functionalized using silane chemistry to introduce different polar [...] Read more.
The quest for sustainable and more efficient energy-converting devices has been the focus of researchers′ efforts in the past decades. In this study, SiO2 nanofiber mats were fabricated through an electrospinning process and later functionalized using silane chemistry to introduce different polar groups −OH (neutral), −SO3H (acidic) and −NH2 (basic). The modified nanofiber mats were embedded in PBI to fabricate mixed matrix membranes. The incorporation of these nanofiber mats in the PBI matrix showed an improvement in the chemical and thermal stability of the composite membranes. Proton conduction measurements show that PBI composite membranes containing nanofiber mats with basic groups showed higher proton conductivities, reaching values as high as 4 mS·cm−1 at 200 °C. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polymeric Materials for Electrical Applications)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Back to TopTop